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Remembering Alto Parts
Topic Started: 19 Nov 2015, 09:37 PM (1,349 Views)
Pori
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A. Nony Mouse
So...this isn't ocarina related, but i couldn't find a better place to ask.


We have...3 practices? Left until the christmas choir preforms, and we've added the largest piece in the world (that I know of). Yep. That one. The Hallelujah Chorus. Yay.
We have many altos, but there are more sopranos, and they're loud. And I don't just mean really loud. I mean REALLY LOUD.


Whereas, I am probably the loudest alto without screaming.


Is there an easier way to remember the alto part for this piece without getting distracted by the sopranos? :eager: :paranoid:


Here's a PDF if that helps.


Hallelujah Chorus Sheet Music (all parts)
Edited by Pori, 19 Nov 2015, 09:37 PM.
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Jack Campin
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Opener of Catfood Tins

I find it very difficult to remember accompaniment lines unless I've created them myself, even in the absence of shrieky competition, so I can only sympathize.

Let me guess, the sopranos are mostly blonde?
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acox
Andy Cox
Jack, you are something else!
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Pori
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A. Nony Mouse
Oh wow Jack! No, about half are blonde. Two of the members are my mom and sister and we're all brunette (and proud of it!), and one is a dirty blonde if you can count that...but she's not pure blonde because my other friend, her sister, is a brunette, so...yeah.
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pandorado100
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I have problems with playing accompaniment parts too. Since I have trouble interpreting timing from music sheets I can't seem to play in sync with the melody part. I'd have to hear someone else play the accompaniment and then duplicate the timing from that.
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I was in a symphonic band for around 8 years with around 50 members with different sections, the ablity to sing your part with out distraction just comes from experience, also its going to sound different to you than it will to the audience, just sing your part the way you always do, and if you cant hear yourself and you're still singing it, it should be fine. Remember the music for it will always be correct and as long as you can sing your part alone good, you can sing it the same way in the group and to the audience it should sound good. Practice makes perfect. It's not about overpowering, hearing yourself or being the loudest it's about blending.

In terms from one of my favorite movies "one band one sound"
Edited by Loading..., 21 Nov 2015, 08:42 AM.
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Claytone
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Double Ocarinist x 2
Why don't you play it on an Alto G ocarina with a Hallelujah recording as backing track?
This will add the muscle memory to your learning process and it's pure fun.

On youtube you find a lot of choral learning material.
https://www.youtube.com/results?q=Hallelujah+handel+practice+part

Last but not least: If you improve your sight reading you become more and more independent from memorizing your part. Using the ocarina will also help in this regard.

@Jack Campin
Most sopranos in church choirs I know have taken Dowland's madrigal to heart.
https://youtu.be/gLVc8YOELKc
Edited by Claytone, 21 Nov 2015, 10:27 AM.
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Pori
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A. Nony Mouse
That'd be helpful, but at the last practice someone took my ocarina...yay...
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Reiko Souma
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Social Butterfly Ocarinist
Oh yes...the Hallelujah Chorus, that wonderfully dreaded song by Handel with those really high above-the-staff notes not just for sopranos, but for tenors as well. I miss conducting and singing it (even the bass part!), but I can try to help you out a bit...

First, the director should be telling all of the sopranos to tone it down from fortissimo to mezzo-forte. If they're as loud as your words, "really loud" are big, then that means a number of them are screaming and shouldn't be. I'd be knocking some of them right down to alto until they're able to control their singing volumes much better, but I'm not there and you're not the director... -sigh-

To avoid being distracted by the sopranos during rehearsals, cup your hand around the ear where you hear the sopranos screaming singing from. By doing this, the outside of your cupped hand is reducing the volume that's coming from the sopranos (and probably a few tenors and basses, depending on the setup) whilst redirecting your ear to pay more attention to the notes you're singing.

How well can you read notes and follow along with a backing track? I recommend playing the backing track whilst playing the alto notes out on a keyboard or piano that you can access. If you can't do this, then please let me know and I'll send you some materials after work. :)

I'm a music director! -innocent grin-
Edited by Reiko Souma, 30 Jun 2016, 05:56 PM.
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Pori
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A. Nony Mouse
Reiko Souma
30 Jun 2016, 05:55 PM
Oh yes...the Hallelujah Chorus, that wonderfully dreaded song by Handel with those really high above-the-staff notes not just for sopranos, but for tenors as well. I miss conducting and singing it (even the bass part!), but I can try to help you out a bit...

First, the director should be telling all of the sopranos to tone it down from fortissimo to mezzo-forte. If they're as loud as your words, "really loud" are big, then that means a number of them are screaming and shouldn't be. I'd be knocking some of them right down to alto until they're able to control their singing volumes much better, but I'm not there and you're not the director... -sigh-

To avoid being distracted by the sopranos during rehearsals, cup your hand around the ear where you hear the sopranos screaming singing from. By doing this, the outside of your cupped hand is reducing the volume that's coming from the sopranos (and probably a few tenors and basses, depending on the setup) whilst redirecting your ear to pay more attention to the notes you're singing.

How well can you read notes and follow along with a backing track? I recommend playing the backing track whilst playing the alto notes out on a keyboard or piano that you can access. If you can't do this, then please let me know and I'll send you some materials after work. :)

I'm a music director! -innocent grin-
Lol, thanks for that. I got it down after a few run-throughs, and if you put the music in my hand, I'm 100% confident I could sing it, even without the music.

The conductor did reveal that we might be doing this song again next year - I guess I'll find out when I go to the practice tonight. But I will keep this in mind when practicing this year :grin:

Also, it wasn't as hard as everyone makes it out to be. You just got to know what you're doing.
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Kitten Forest
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Double Ocarinist
What helped me with singing it in high school was to trick my mind into thinking that the alto part was the melody, and try to forget about the soprano part. But that takes a lot of focus.
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Reiko Souma
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Social Butterfly Ocarinist
Pori
12 Sep 2016, 02:56 AM
Reiko Souma
30 Jun 2016, 05:55 PM
Oh yes...the Hallelujah Chorus, that wonderfully dreaded song by Handel with those really high above-the-staff notes not just for sopranos, but for tenors as well. I miss conducting and singing it (even the bass part!), but I can try to help you out a bit...

First, the director should be telling all of the sopranos to tone it down from fortissimo to mezzo-forte. If they're as loud as your words, "really loud" are big, then that means a number of them are screaming and shouldn't be. I'd be knocking some of them right down to alto until they're able to control their singing volumes much better, but I'm not there and you're not the director... -sigh-

To avoid being distracted by the sopranos during rehearsals, cup your hand around the ear where you hear the sopranos screaming singing from. By doing this, the outside of your cupped hand is reducing the volume that's coming from the sopranos (and probably a few tenors and basses, depending on the setup) whilst redirecting your ear to pay more attention to the notes you're singing.

How well can you read notes and follow along with a backing track? I recommend playing the backing track whilst playing the alto notes out on a keyboard or piano that you can access. If you can't do this, then please let me know and I'll send you some materials after work. :)

I'm a music director! -innocent grin-
Lol, thanks for that. I got it down after a few run-throughs, and if you put the music in my hand, I'm 100% confident I could sing it, even without the music.

The conductor did reveal that we might be doing this song again next year - I guess I'll find out when I go to the practice tonight. But I will keep this in mind when practicing this year :grin:

Also, it wasn't as hard as everyone makes it out to be. You just got to know what you're doing.
Did I mention that I also sing primarily alto when I'm not being asked to sing soprano or tenor? XD Fun times.
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