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How to practise playing the ocarina; A short guide
Topic Started: 1 Jul 2010, 08:53 AM (26,535 Views)
Krešimir Cindrić


How to practise playing the ocarina
A short guide by Krešimir Cindrić


Here is some advice on how to practise playing the ocarina. This is not, by any means, the final word on the subject, but rather a small collection of tips I found useful from personal experience. I hope it will be helpful.

What you’ll need:
  • an ocarina, obviously
  • a metronome and a tuner
  • some free time and motivation to improve

I will assume the reader is at least to some degree familiar with sheet music reading. This is a really important skill without which any progress on playing the ocarina may be very slow and difficult. If you use various tabs to play the ocarina, forget about it - they do more harm than good. The sooner you get rid of that useless crutch the better!

I find using a metronome to be very helpful. I prefer digital to mechanic metronomes, because they are small, durable, more practical and fairly cheap. Some digital metronomes come with a chromatic tuner and these are especially useful – just make sure that the tuner encompasses the range of your ocarina. I use Korg TM-40 and I find it pretty decent. You can also download free metronome and tuner software (you will need a microphone to use the tuner software, though).

Of course, many will argue whether the metronome is useful - it is an old debate. Some encourage it's use and some do not. It is evident that many people make great progress without using the metronome. However, from personal experience, I have found the metronome to be extremely useful as it forces the player to think quickly.


[anchor=1, practicesessions]Practice sessions[/anchor]

When it comes to practicing a skill such as playing an instrument, the most important thing, in my opinion, is continuity. It is much better to practise at least 15 minutes every day, than 5 hours once a week. Playing the ocarina is a fun activity and it should be kept that way. However, when it comes to using the time efficiently to improve playing skills, some discipline is necessary. That is why it is best to split practice sessions into two parts – serious practice and fun playing. In the “serious practice” part, you should work systematically on specific problems, and during the “fun” part you should, well… have fun. It is probably better to first do the “serious” stuff while you’re feeling rested, and than reward yourself with the “fun” part afterwards.

You should avoid long practice sessions. If you have a lot of free time, it is better to have many shorter practice sessions during the day, than one very long. A beginner should not play for more than 30 minutes at a time, because they haven’t yet learned to relax when holding the ocarina and long practice sessions can result in sore and stiff fingers, which definitely does not help in playing. Also, long practice sessions are often tiring and can lead to poor concentration, so they are not the efficient use of time.

Playing an instrument requires a lot of multitasking, there is a lot to think about: correct notes, fingerings, counting measures/rhythim, places to breathe and breathing technique, keeping fingers relaxed, body posture, interpretation, etc... When practising, it is impossible to do it all at the same time, so it is important to focus on working on one thing until you can do it without thinking and then move on to the other.

So, the way to improve is to 1) practise every day, 2) keep the practice sessions short and 3) work on specific things.


[anchor=1, newpiece]Learning to play a new piece[/anchor]

When you start playing a new piece, it is often useful to separate it into several “chunks” and work on each one separately. This is especially true if the piece is long. Each “chunk” can be several measures long but sufficiently small to be repeated many times. Each “chunk” can be practised in several steps. Here are the usual steps I recommend when it comes to learning a new piece:

1. Reading the music and learning the notes and the rhythm
2. Playing with a metronome
3. Identifying critical places and working on them
4. Working on intonation
5. Working on interpretation

The step one is rather straightforward. You pick up the ocarina and play from the sheets, paying attention to playing the right notes and roughly following the rhythm. At this stage it is all right to stutter and pause in the middle of the music and the rhythm and the intonation to not have to be very precise. You should play through the piece (or the smaller part of the piece) a few times to get familiar with it.

The step two is the boring one and requires some discipline. You should set the metronome to a very slow tempo and play the piece. It is important to stay synchronized to the metronome and to play the rhythm very precisely. Repetition is the main theme here. Play it over and over again. If you have trouble keeping up, set the metronome to the slower tempo. You should soon become very comfortable and then it is time to gradually increase the tempo. Always take the time to practise at the slower tempo before advancing to the faster tempo, but also keep challenging yourself and do not stay for too long on the slow tempo. The metronome is a very important part of this, since it forces you to keep up in time and think fast. Music is a sculpture that exists only in time – without time it is nothing. And when playing music, there is no time to stutter and pause!

There will be places in the piece at which you will frequently make the same mistakes over and over again. It is important to identify these places. This is step three. When you identify a place where there is a high chance of making a mistake, do not ignore it and continue onwards. It is very bad to “practice mistakes” because then it is much more difficult to correct them. These places should be practised separately in endless loops. Also, always use a metronome, starting in slow tempo and gradually increasing it as you get more comfortable.

The goal is to play the piece comfortably in the real tempo, without playing any wrong notes and making mistakes in rhythm. When you achieve this (I call it “having the piece in your fingers”) you can begin working on details. Using a tuner can help you control your breathing to stay in tune. Playing in tune is, obviously, very important, but it’s very hard to listen to yourself and think about staying in tune without having the piece in your fingers first. You should not rely completely on the tuner, though. Take effort to listen to yourself.

The final part of learning a new piece is working on interpretation. This is the most difficult part to describe, but it should be quite intuitive. While anyone with some discipline and patience can develop a good playing technique through practice, a good interpretation of a piece relies on musician’s musicality, creativity, talent and taste. Listening to music played by good musicians can be a great source of inspiration and learning if you pay attention to details, like phrasing and ornamentation. It is good to copy the great musicians, but don’t do so blindly – always follow your feeling, because you can have a great technique, but if you don’t feel the music, it will sound mediocre and uninteresting.



UPDATE: I have decided to re-post from other posts a selection of tips, just to keep things neatly in one place:


[anchor=1, drills]On drills and exercises[/anchor]

Drills and special exercises are just music pieces (usually somewhat aesthetically limited and hence somewhat boring, hehe) which, when practised, focus on a specific problem. They are a good way to quickly solve a specific problem, like a steady supply of air (whole note drill), intonation (interval leaps), phrasing, alternative fingering, double tonguing, playing quick passages, vibrato, etc...

Therefore, I would treat them exactly as other music pieces that I'm practicing. For example, if I'm learning a piece in B flat major, I would also want to learn a Bb scale and arpeggios of major chords in Bb major. I would practise these pieces exactly the same way as I practise other music pieces, i.e. follow the usual 5 steps (of course, there isn't much to do in step no. 5) and dedicate them the time which is necessary to be able to play them in a quick tempo without making any mistake (of course, always start slowly and gradually increase the tempo).


[anchor=1, methodbooks]Method books[/anchor]

The best way to get a nice set of exercises is to get a good ocarina method book. The one I found to be the best (and it is free to download) is "The Mezzetti Ocarina Tutor", by Alberto Napoleone Mezzetti, co-inventor of the ocarina, a member of the first ocarina group, great ocarina player, composer and arranger of music for ocarina, teacher of ocarina, brother of the famous ocarina maker Ercole Mezzetti and an ocarina maker himself. It is focused on 10-hole ocarinas, so there aren't any exercises for using the subholes, but other than that, it is perfect for any transverse ocarina. You can download the method book (as well as a lot of other method books and ocarina-specific music) at Giorgio Pacchioni's Biblioteca dell'Ocarina (you'll need to register, but registration is free).

If that book is too advanced to follow, a good book aimed at beginners is "Metodo Base per Ocarina" by Giorgio Pacchioni, also available at the Biblioteca. Also, I recommend Pacchioni's "Studi giornalieri metodici per Ocarina" as a nice collection of exercises for everyday practise.

Two very good method books are available at Official site of the Ocarina di Budrio. These books are in Italian (as ocarina is an Italian instrument, a fact many people forget these days), but fortunately, sheet music is universal, and text is not nearly as important as exercises. Hopefully, there will be translations to English in the future, but until then you always have Google Translate.

If you're looking for music to play, a good place is www.flutetunes.com. A great resource for classical music is IMSLP/Petrucci Music Library. Searching the internet is also a great skill to have. :D

A good practice is to create your own collection of exercises and sheet music, so you can easily find them.

You can also purchase method books for ocarina at various other places, like Johann Rotter's Ocarina Workshop, Mountain Ocarinas' webpage and STL's webpage, but with so much free resources available online, I advise against spending money on a method book. Often times, you will see advertisements for method books and even DVD's, which will almost promise you to learn to play the ocarina instead of you, but in reality offer nothing more than what you can figure out yourself, or using the free ocarina method books.


[anchor=1, intervalleaps]Exercises to develop good sense of pitch and a few tips on using the tuner[/anchor]

In order to develop good intonation on the ocarina, it is helpful to practise melodic interval leaps. This is, in my opinion, the most fundamental exercise for the ocarina. It is quite boring and requires some discipline and patience, but it helps a lot.

First play the diatonic thirds in C major like this: C, E, D, F, E, G, F, A, G, B, A, C, B, D, C, E, D, F
Next, diatonic fourths in C major, i.e.: C, F, D, G, E, A, F, B, G, C, A, D, B, E, C, F
Then diatonic fifths, diatonic sixths, diatonic sevenths and finally diatonic octaves.

Next, try the same thing in G major (start on C, but instead of F play F#), F major, D major, B flat major, A major, E flat major, and all other major keys...

Also, you can play the chromatic intervals:
Start with chromatic major seconds: C, D, C#, D#, D, E, Eb, F, E, F#, F, G, F#, G#...
Then, chromatic minor thirds: C, Eb, C#, E, D, F, D#, F#, E, G, F, Ab...
Next, chromatic major thirds: C, E, Db, F, D, F#, Eb, G, E, G#, F, A...
Then chromatic perfect fourths, chromatic perfect fifths, chromatic minor sevenths, chromatic major sevenths and finally chromatic octaves. You get the idea... :)

It is important to know how each interval should sound and then listen to yourself carefully.

Getting a tuner is a good idea, as long as you are careful not to allow yourself to become dependent on it. A tuner can help you a lot, but it can also become a crutch.

Here are some tips on using a tuner:

- The tuner will tell you the concert pitch, not the ocarina's relative pitch. For example, if you play the note C on an ocarina in G, the tuner will display G. It is important to think in terms of ocarina's pitch, not the concert pitch, therefore do not use the tuner to determine which note you are playing, just if that note is off or not.

- When practising a piece using a tuner - once you manage to be able to control your ocarina to be in tune when looking at the tuner, force yourself to turn off the tuner and play without it.

- If you are in doubt about being in tune or not, try recording your self playing and check later with a tuner if you were correct. Make sure that your recording setup does not mess up the intonation, though.

- The above exercises in melodic interval leaps are great when combined with a tuner, as you can focus more on correct breathing and not worry so much on listening yourself. However, try to develop a habit to listen to yourself a lot.

Not really tuner related, but helps tremendously with ear training: sing a lot. Try to be in tune when singing. Record yourself singing. It will most likely sound horrible to you at first, but don't get discouraged. Singing is the best way to learn to hear!

Also, listen to music a lot. But that is obvious (yet often forgotten)...

And remember, as long as you have healthy hearing, you are not "tone deaf". The term "tone deafness" was invented many centuries ago by people who didn't understand the nature of music perception. Don't let anyone ever tell you that you're tone deaf - such people are fools and it is beneficial for you to not be in their company. Anybody with healthy hearing can learn to be in tune, hear all the intervals correctly and have a good perception of pitch. For some, it may take more practice than for others, but anybody can do it if they are motivated and dedicated.

I wholeheartedly recommend GNU Solfege, an amazing (and completely free) software for ear training.

For a general assessment of intonation, there is a very interesting software called Flutini.

[anchor=1, metronome]More on metronome[/anchor]

Metronome is not a performance tool, used to replace a conductor or help you with recordings. It is a practice tool, designed to push you out of your comfort zone and force you to play in time and think quickly when you're struggling to learn a piece!

How should you use it? First learn the correct notes of the piece you're practising. If you don't know the correct fingerings of all notes required to play the piece, and have to think about it, it is pointless to use a metronome. Once you do this, turn on the metronome and set it to a very slow tempo - maybe 40 beats per minute. Play the piece (or a part of it, if it is a long piece) about 10 times on that slow tempo, making sure you're synchronised to beats. It may be confusing to keep synchronised, and that is not unusual - after you struggle with it for some time, it will be easier. Once you find it too easy (which means you can do it every time 100% correctly, without much effort), increase the tempo by a little bit, for example to 44 beats per minute. Repeat the procedure - once this becomes too easy, increase the tempo to 48 and play until it becomes easy to do every time. This should be enough practice for one day. Next day, start at 48 bpm. If you find it difficult, go back to 44. Gradually increase the tempo over the next few days until you can do it easily at quick tempo, maybe somewhere between 132-160 bpm, or more if the piece demands it.

Now, if go back to the actual tempo of the piece, you will most likely find it quite easy to keep in time. If so, the metronome did what it was designed for, now turn it off and do not use it again for this piece unless you find it necessary.



NOTE: Since English is not my native language, I would appreciate someone proof reading this and send me a PM or an email with what I should correct. Whoever notices a grammatical error or a typo gets a virtual cookie :D
Edited by Krešimir Cindrić, 13 Jul 2012, 10:06 PM.
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Glup
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A nice thing you made here Krešimir, but personally I do not think a recipe is what it takes to improve.

My greatest tip to those who want to improve fast is Have Fun!!
If it's fun to play, you will improve, you will get all the motivation you need, and you'll learn the songs you want. adding a metronome is also handy, but not really neccesary if ypu play with backtracks.

Sorry if this post offended you in any way Krešimir. :shame:
I just had to post my own opinion.
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Krešimir Cindrić


As I said, "this is not, by any means, the final word on the subject, but rather a small collection of tips I found useful from personal experience."

Of course I am not offended by your opinion. :D There are many different ways to become a good ocarina player and everybody should choose what works best for them.

This is how I do it and it gives results for me. It is not a "general recipe to success", as there cannot be such a thing XP

I just wanted to share some of my personal experience in hope it will be helpful to someone.

I agree with you that it is important to have fun, since that is the source of motivation. However, I do not think it is enough - many people have fun without ever achieving good results.
Edited by Krešimir Cindrić, 1 Jul 2010, 09:35 AM.
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ubizmo


The trouble with the "have fun" method is that it depends on who's following it. Some people (many, I believe) will find a comfort zone where they can play a few tunes that they like, and they will plateau right there. They won't continue to improve, because they'll stop challenging themselves. Challenging yourself means pushing yourself out of your comfort zone, and a lot of people just aren't very good at that. There's nothing wrong with finding a few songs you like and just staying at that level. There's no law that says that everybody has to want to continue to improve. But those who do will have to leave the comfort (and therefore fun) zone on a regular basis. This is one of the things that you pay a teacher to do: to kick you out of the comfort zone.

By now, it has been scientifically proven that frequent short practice sessions are superior to less frequent long ones, for learning skills. It's not really in dispute anymore. The reason for this is that learning is an adaptation that takes place in your brain, in response to a challenge. You don't learn that much while practicing, because the adaptation takes place unconsciously, after you stop. So, the best way is to practice briefly, but frequently, and with good focus, on the specific things you're trying to master. You may not, and probably won't, see much happening in any given practice session, but you'll find that the next time you try it, you're surprisingly better. The adaptation took place while you weren't playing. It's a lot like physical exercise, in that respect. If you go to the gym and lift weights, you almost certainly won't find yourself stronger at the end of your workout, and it's now known that long workouts aren't very productive. But if you allow enough time for adaptation between workouts, you'll see the difference the next time you train.

The only thing I'd add to all this is the importance of listening to the kind of music you want to play, and listening with a lot of attention to the details. If you want to play the ocarina as a solo instrument, with musical accompaniment, then you should listen to a lot of solo instrumental music (not just ocarina) in that style. Listen to the details of the phrasing and ornamention. Some details are instrument-specific, but many aren't. Phrasing is the doorway to interpretation, but you can't learn it if you're not listening to it.

Ubizmo
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Glup
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a.k.a totten94
That's true Ubizmo, I didn't really think of the comfort zone, because I enjoy challenges. :shame:
so well.. I like to learn songs that are out of my comfort zone.
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Krešimir Cindrić


Thank you for your contribution and some interesting insight, Ubizmo. :)

I haven't really given much thought about comfort zones, but it makes perfect sense.

Actually, that is the reason why I use a metronome. It really pushes me out of my comfort zone, which is to stutter and pause during the phrase to think about the right notes, the rhythm, etc. But there is no time to do that when practicing with a metronome - it forces me to keep the music flowing (and that is a bit stressful). My mind should be focused on interpretation and feeling of the music, on fine nuances in breath, etc... not on the right notes and the right rhythm - that should my fingers do subconsciously - and I find a metronome very helpful with that.

Of course, many will argue whether the metronome is useful - it is an old debate. Some encourage it's use and some do not. It is evident that many people make great progress without using the metronome, but it can be very helpful, especially when having the concept of comfort zones in mind. I encourage everyone to find the method that works best for them.

As it has been argued many times before on TON, the reasoning can apply tabs. Tabs may create a comfort zone which generates a lot of fun, but prevents further progress. Standard sheet music notation is, without doubt, a superior way of notating and reading music (not to mention it's availability as a resource) so it is advised to spend some time and effort to acquire that skill (which is really nothing very difficult or special).

Inspired by Ubizmo, I have slightly rewritten the passage on interpretation, concerning listening to other musicians playing. I find this advice very useful. Keep 'em coming, please :)
Edited by Krešimir Cindrić, 1 Jul 2010, 05:02 PM.
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darcado
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Transverse Ocarinist x 2
i personally just hop of train to train i start playing a song i manage to somehow play it and get the rhythm slightly then i just go to the next before mastering the previous result i dont rly have any song memorized :O.
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esile567
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@ Ubizmo True true. They leave the comfort-zone, and when they manage their new challenge, that's when it gets fun again. Am I right? ;)

The thing is, playing in my comfort-zone is fun at first, then it get's a little boring. I challenge myself again, I manage it after some practice, and it gets fun again. I feel my self esteem rise, and that's a big reward for me.

I think the key is to not expect too much, and not compare with others too much. And to play songs that you manage well from time to time don't hurt either.

But hey, we are different people. Some people love big challenges, others need smaller ones for their motivation not to fall apart.
(This post got a little messy, Im sorry).

@ Kresimir Cindric Thanks for making this guide! :)
Edited by esile567, 2 Jul 2010, 02:01 PM.
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On a slightly different note: how much do you think one should practice drills (not just songs)? For instance, on piano, I would also play scales, and if I thought a technique (for instance, trilling) needed work, I might practice it separately.

I figured I'd practice scales to work on mastering the note layout, the whole-note drill Ubizmo referred to in his MO help video to work on breath control on sustained notes, and Krešimir's interval drill to work on playing in tune--at least, as a start before I try to learn vibrato, etc. Just wondering and how much you all recommend practicing using techniques in songs, which is obviously very important (and generally more fun.)

Also, are there any other important drills I as a beginner should practice? And how important is it to practice drills once you get more advanced?

BTW, Krešimir, if you hadn't said English wasn't your native language I probably would have assumed you had grown up bilingual all your life.
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Krešimir Cindrić


post content moved to the first post...
Edited by Krešimir Cindrić, 2 Mar 2011, 12:47 PM.
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Blue Dolphin
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Blue Dolphin
I have enjoyed everything that has been written here so far ! Very useful with great tips and insights.
Thanks to all of you. C:
Edited by Blue Dolphin, 6 Jul 2010, 03:29 AM.
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Isobelise
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Pendant Ocarinist x 3
I allways think that if you can play a Musical scale fluently and without a flaw (off-tune) you're pretty well along the way.
I used to do this everyday on the guitar and it helps a lot! With the ocarina aswell, even after only playing it for 5 days I notice a increase of clear tones and a better souplesse in my fingers. I can also hear that in the little songs I now play ^^.
Hope this will help some one :D

Kisses Liz

(sorry for my bad musical jargon)
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Vermin
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Well, if you can't play a scale in tune, you definitely have a lot to exercise. Playing songs in tune will be harder as well. It does make a lot of sense. I should really start playing scales more often. I always have a tuner with me (one that that I can even call with yeah). Tuners have been, and still are, very helpful to me. I feel the main problem with ocarinas is that you can't always find that piece Kresimir was talking about. That piece that had these challenges. Of coarse, even easier songs can be challenging. I've been able to play Hatvikah for a very long time, but that was all about technique. It was only recently that I found out how much interpretation and such lives inside of me, but as of yet, I can't use it unless a much more skilled musician is playing along. Thank God I have a roommate who lives the guitar. I think having people accompany you can be very useful. It will allow you to use their interpretation to create something cool. Especially for beginners like me, that is very useful. Those people can also correct you when you're making mistakes of which you're not aware.
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lostandfrowned
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i thought this was helpful!

though sometimes i just play things for the fun of it

sometimes i just dont even really play at all i just play along with songs that i hear and try to mimic them XD
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Vermin
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That's an extremely great thing to do. It will help you develop a better musical hearing, which in turn might help you keeping your oc in tune.
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atkeane
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Not to cause harm by posting to an old topic, but given its recent inclusion on Facebook by Songbird, I have an addition I feel might help.

I also find a metronome to be a nice thing to work with. For me, it's mostly to keep myself from going instantly to full tempo. In my head I have an idea of how fast a song should be, an idea of when I should be doing what. Of course, when first learning a song, we often can't instantly play every bit of it at full tempo. A metronome provides me with an external time, which forces me to be mindful of how fast I play. Most of my frustration from playing new songs comes from trying to up the tempo too fast, and stumbling over phrases. Using a metronome makes me remember to slow it all down, and then I can gradually bring it up to speed as my fingers/lungs grow used to the transitions between the notes in the different passages.

That being said, the sound of a metronome can be rather distracting sometimes, especially the digital ones, where they use a tone to keep the time. If the tone it plays is disharmonic from the music, I can occasionally mess up while I try to figure out why a note was "wrong"
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DryUrTears
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a metronome confuses me
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Juzam Djinn
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I would try playing with a metronome with verious instruments. I really don't know if it helped or not, it was always just kindof...there.
Maybe it's from years of playing as part of the rhythm section (bass/tuba).

When I learn songs without written music/by ear, I often whistle the song. Then play a few measures, whistle play a few more measures. Works pretty fast for me.

Krešimir Cindrić , Your practice guide looks like a usefull list of tips for new players.
Edited by Juzam Djinn, 13 Feb 2011, 01:39 AM.
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Krešimir Cindrić


UPDATE: I have decided to re-post from other posts a selection of tips, just to keep things neatly in one place.

Hopefully I will add more stuff in the future. Thanks for all the nice feedback. :D
Edited by Krešimir Cindrić, 2 Mar 2011, 02:16 AM.
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Zero Tolerance
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Very helpful indeed but sadly I'm kind of a "Play-by-ear/just-go-with-it" kind of player.

I can't read real sheet music (Can read number tabs very well though) so I had to learn to do things a little different but I totally understand the concepts of "Comfort zone", "Short Sessions" and "Rough-Patch Repeat"

Either way. An all around solid topic. 2 thumbs up. ^-^
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DBX
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previously DRCification
DryUrTears
12 Nov 2010, 07:01 PM
a metronome confuses me
I sometimes notice that a metronome could be less confusing if you adjust the volume a little bit. Good luck
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Krešimir Cindrić


Added a new paragraph on how to use a metronome.
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Achint
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Fat Mouse >^_^<

I found this very helpful! I've incorporated this into my guitar playing and as soon as I get my ocarina, I'll start off right =D
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Jack Campin
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Quote:
 
I wholeheartedly recommend GNU Solfege, an amazing (and completely free) software for ear training.


I use Macs. The GNU site says I can install it on MacOS X using MacPorts (an emulator of nightmare flakiness and complexity that lets you run software written for X Windows) but doesn't actually provide a link to any version of Solfege for MacOS that I could download in the unlikely event that I ever got MacPorts to work.

I have some old programs wrtten for MacOS 9 that do the same sort of thing so I'm not in any hurry to try Solfege, thanks.

This is fairly typical of Sourceforge's attitude to the Mac.
Edited by Jack Campin, 6 May 2011, 04:23 PM.
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RJ924
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My ocarina has no hair...either

Kres,
Thank you for the links in your first post. I missed this thread when it was first posted. I just looked at some of those, and put them on my computer. It is nice to have something that is made specifically for the ocarina. I enjoy this type of stuff.
Roger
I downloaded the pdf files from the Budrio site that you gave us Kres. I know you say that the practice sessions should be short, but I often play for extended periods of time. Anyway, I went completely through the "Metodo teorico praticamente facile" book. I played everything in it. I enjoyed each of the new practice pieces, and the songs that were in the book. I had trouble on page 53 (page 51 in the pdf) with the 2/8 time. I don't think I have ever played 2/8 time in my life. That was the first time I remember ever seeing something written in that time signature. Anyway, it was easy in places, challenging in others, and a lot of fun. I'm looking forward to going back and practicing certain parts and to going on to the other books. Thanks again.
Roger
Edited by RJ924, 24 Jul 2011, 12:50 PM.
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bluebell
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Compulsive collector
Ok, so i gave the metronome thing reccomended here a go. It felt less progressive, because i had to go back to very basic songs, but man did i notice a difference. i had to really think, and i was looking forward to the "fun" part of the session at the end of it. fantastic work Kres. thanks.
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Krešimir Cindrić


Thanks, bluebell! I'm happy you like it and find it useful. It is always much, much better to play simple music, but play it well, than to play complex music and be sloppy! :D
Edited by Krešimir Cindrić, 24 Jul 2011, 04:25 PM.
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RJ924
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My ocarina has no hair...either

I spent the last 45 minutes, or so, playing the 30 pages of the 'nuovo metodo per ocarina'. I have to admit that I did play the very simple, slow stuff at the beginning in cut time though. I think this book is excellent for all beginners, and wish I would have had it years ago when I started teaching the ocarina to some people. I will definitely incorporate this into that program. Nothing in it is very difficult to play, and it will be a great confidence builder to the person who is willing to apply themselves to it. It starts very slow and easy, and progresses naturally (imo). I would highly recommend this book to be used along with Kres' instructional guide above. Thanks again, Kres, for this stuff.
Roger
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Xeikh
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Zeldarian Ocarinist
Thanks a lot for this guide... n.n
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Tootieflutie
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Double Ocarinist x 3
:hug: Thank you, thank you, thank you!! This is wonderful for someone who has never played an ocarina before (and for you other folks, too!)
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Uronoro
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Where Have You Sinners Gone?

Better than the guide I was considering making:

Wake up, eat, pick up ocarina, blow and wiggle fingers, put it down, give brief thought to life responsibilities, eat again, sleep. Repeat.
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Aleatz
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Uronoro
27 Nov 2011, 01:29 AM
Wake up, eat, pick up ocarina, blow and wiggle fingers, put it down, give brief thought to life responsibilities, eat again, sleep. Repeat.
Oi, quit stalking! Lulz.
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Uronoro
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Where Have You Sinners Gone?

Aleatz
27 Nov 2011, 12:14 PM
Oi, quit stalking! Lulz.
...Stalking? :?
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Allochii
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Still learning...
I'm sorry but, I'm so confused about the section on melodic interval leaps.
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Aleatz
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Uronoro
27 Nov 2011, 07:23 PM
...Stalking? :?
Your post was a summary of my typical day. ;)
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ocarinas on wheels
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pendant/transverse Ocarinist
but, what can i do about nervousness? at school, when i play and someone passes by i freeze.
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fermataheart
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ocarinas on wheels
19 Jan 2012, 06:09 AM
but, what can i do about nervousness? at school, when i play and someone passes by i freeze.
I used to be like this a lot, but now it seldom happens. The secret?

The confidence comes from knowing the songs you play inside and out. As long as you KNOW you know the song all you have to do is put your feeling into it and not mind the passerbys.

That and just getting used to playing in front of others :)
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ocarinas on wheels
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pendant/transverse Ocarinist
thanks for the tips.
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RJ924
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My ocarina has no hair...either

I was just thinking of this excellent post by Kres, and thought I would give it a bump for those new to the ocarina, or to music in general. I think this is Kresimer's greatest contribution to the TON community, and outweighs anything I have done. ;) Thanks again, Kres.
Roger
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8bitjosh
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"After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressable is music." -Aldous Huxley
It really is very usefull. I will have to look into the resources he gives. I already have a metronome, so I don;t need that, but I'm short on everything else haha.
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Suki
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Haaaaaaaiiiiiii! ^_^

It was a good artical but I have to say when playing the ocarina gets to technicial I lose interest. I have to keep it fun. I have to admit I'm yet to understand sheet musicand know once I do that'll open up many doors for me. For now I'm just having fun and happy where I am. :)
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fermataheart
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"High and Mighty"
Suki
20 May 2012, 04:56 AM
It was a good artical but I have to say when playing the ocarina gets to technicial I lose interest. I have to keep it fun. I have to admit I'm yet to understand sheet musicand know once I do that'll open up many doors for me. For now I'm just having fun and happy where I am. :)
Well, as long as you're happy with your skills as is and don't want to improve you don't have to get technical.
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Suki
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Haaaaaaaiiiiiii! ^_^

Fermataheart I never said I did not want to improve. I nearly practice everyday in fact. In my opinion practicing the ocarina is like anything else that it all depends on the player. As the poster said there is not a perfect formula to practicing the ocarina. Take excercise for example, one person can claim cardio works for keeping the body fit while another person claims yoga is the way to go. As there are many different methods of excercise so are there different methods of practicing the ocarina.
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fermataheart
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"High and Mighty"
There comes a point where passagework and technique practice is vital. Even though it's grueling work, it only makes playing easier in the end.

There are just some things that can not be avoided. The technical side of music is one thing that can't be avoided forever. That's all I was trying to say.
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RJ924
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My ocarina has no hair...either

fermataheart
21 May 2012, 02:18 AM
There comes a point where passagework and technique practice is vital. Even though it's grueling work, it only makes playing easier in the end...blah, blah... :)
I agree that anyone serious about music will eventually have to learn to read music, which will lead to practicing "technique" as you put it. I don't think it has to be grueling. It will be challenging, but that is fun to me (even when it is sometimes frustrating because my skill level isn't as high as the level I am trying to practice at). I love to sight read (reading and playing music for the first time). It is a challenge, and I learn some pretty fun songs to play. I personally hate tabs or the number systems out there, but my kids learned the numbers first, then went to reading music, so it works. Learning to read music and to practice properly can be difficult, but almost all things worthwhile in this world are. The rewards are worth the effort.
RJ
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