Welcome Guest [Log In] [Register]

- News Ticker

Donations - Please consider donating to The Ocarina Network to keep us afloat. More detail can be found in this topic. •
The Ocarina Network - Serving the ocarina community since April 27th 2008
Welcome to The Ocarina Network, a place for ocarina enthusiasts from all around the globe!

You're currently viewing The Ocarina Network as a guest.

If you join The Ocarina Network, you'll be able to access member-only sections, and use many member-only features such as customising your profile, sending personal messages, and voting in polls. On top of that we have a great number of music scores and backtracks for you to download.

Registration is simple, fast, and completely free.

Register at The Ocarina Network!

If you're already a member please log into your account to access all of our features:

Username:   Password:
Add Reply
Mountain Ocarinas; Quality durable inline ocarinas
Topic Started: 20 Nov 2009, 04:02 PM (39,244 Views)
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
I am very excited about the possibility of getting a ProRange. I don't know how long it will be before I can afford one but it is very much on my wish list.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
Saki
18 Jan 2015, 04:06 AM
I'm excited, especially since it uses the left thumb hole to play high D. One of the reasons I ended up returning my MO was because I couldn't stand switching thumbhole patterns between my two ocarinas.

I'll be kind of disappointed if it doesn't have low B though. I rarely ever need low A but I find myself using low B all the time.
I agree it would be nice to have the low B I need it quite often as well.

From what I understand about the thumbs the right thumb is used to do the chamber switch somehow.

I am not sure how it works because I haven't seen one or seen any drawings.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
Jarlaxle
3 Mar 2015, 06:34 AM
The mountain C is my walkabout and has been on my person almost constantly since i got it, higher pitches hurt my ears so i avoided the g. How long has it been since the pro-range was announced anyway?
From what I understand Carl has been working on it off and on for about 10 years now. I think that is is going to go into production 'soon' but I am not sure what soon means in that context.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
Here is a message from Karl that was posted on Mountains Ocarinas Forums concerning the "Pro Range"

Quote:
 

Well… where should I begin? First, I am touched by how supportive you have been! You guys have really hung in there with us despite the interminable wait, and I am grateful. So, here’s a little update on “Pro-Range.” (For the record, what we’ve been calling “Pro-range” here on the forum actually goes by another name, but I’ll be talking more about that soon. For the purposes of this post, I’ll just call it PR.)

PR is light, durable, pleasing, fluid-fingering, has a small, pocket-sized footprint, and plays two chromatic octaves. It really is the take-along flute I’ve always wanted but couldn’t get anywhere. I love playing it!

I tried hard to bring PR to the market this past Christmas, but I realized that, in order to make any money on the instrument, I’d have to charge $400 a piece. Also, production was going to be extremely limited because, even though PR is simple and intuitive to play, its interior design is very complex and requires great precision. Thus, I finally decided not to offer you an overly expensive, virtually unavailable flute last year.

After continuing to test and consider other manufacturing options, I’ve decided to place an order for quality injection molds on August 1st--about 5 weeks from now. PR needs to be molded as several “interlocking” components, so the molds are not cheap. However, at present, this is the only manufacturing method I’m aware of that will provide the precision we need while allowing us to lower the price substantially and keep up with demand. Although the Connecticut-based molder says the molds will take 8 weeks to build, my own experience would suggest that it could take up to 12 weeks--or even a bit more. Hopefully this will put PR in your hands sometime in October or early November.

How will we pay for the molds? At present, we plan to pay for the molds by creating detailed PR demonstration videos and then pre-selling a certain number of instruments (at a discount) to our past customers. You’ll be hearing more about that soon. If you are not on the PR waiting list and would like to be, please email us at info@MountainOcarinas.com .

Feel free to ask me any other questions you may have. I’ll be pleased to answer them, unless you press too hard for information that is still classified, in which case I may feel compelled to send one of my “associates” to your house late one night to have a “friendly” chat with you.




In a follow up message Karl stated that he hopes to have the price "under $100" I can't wait to own one of them. Karl has been working on this for over 10 years so you know it will be as close to perfect as he can make it.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
Here is the latest update from Karl about his new Ocarina. It looks like He has been working on it very hard for the last month.

Quote:
 

Re: Something to talk about...the "ProRange"
« Reply #120 on: Today at 04:12:36 pm »
Reply with quoteQuote
Okay, time for an update. I've been meaning to post again as soon as I had every thing worked out, but... I've been on an all out prototyping sprint for the last month. Here's why.

First, a little background... I originally designed "PR" (which will have another name when released) to be made from Dymondwood. Later, when Dymondwood was no longer available, I tested many materials and ultimately switched to Micarta. (Because of the complex design and precision of this instrument, less stable or durable materials such as traditional hardwoods are not suitable.) After a very long process of prototyping, spread across several versions, countless variations of each version, and even a few different names, I was finally ready to release "PR." However, after some months of trying to work out all the production issues, I finally had to accept the difficult reality that my micarta flutes would require far too much highly skilled labor. As mentioned previously, the price would have to be too high for your liking or mine, and supply would be extremely limited. In other words, most of you would probably never get to play one.

After considering other options, I switched to 3D printing, attracted by the ability that 3D printing would give me to respond quickly to feedback from customers. With help from a grant from the State of Connecticut, the wonderful people at the Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology got me through the initial stages of the the 3D printing process. Ultimately, after a lot of experimentation and testing of different 3D printing technologies, I finally realized --once again-- that the 3D prints would also require several hours of skilled labor in order to produce a top quality flute. That, along with high printing costs, meant that 3D printed instruments would also have to be expensive and rare. (And the truth is, even though we printed the instrument in a few pieces so that I could perform extensive tweaking inside and out, my 3D printed instruments simply don't play quite as well as my precision-machined micarta instruments. 3D printing is a fantastically useful technology, but the precision and surface quality is still lacking for my particular application.)

Now we are moving toward injection molding, a process that --provided the mold is made correctly-- can deliver the kind of precision and affordable prices that I'm striving for. What is the hold up? Well, since I designed "PR" with other technologies in mind, there are certain features that don't translate well to injection molding. After a few meetings with our mold designer, I realized that, unless I was willing to make some design changes, excellent results were not a sure thing. Even though it was initially discouraging to think of changes at this late stage, I wasn't willing to roll the dice on iffy mold design. This new flute is really something special, and the injection molded version should be every bit as good as my prototypes.

Unfortunately, one of the needed changes involved tweaking the large sound chamber. Of course, I thought I'd be done after an intensive sprint of a week or so. However, every little change inside a chamber can affect sound, tuning, toneholes, voicing dimensions, etc., and making super precise prototypes to test the variables is very time-consuming. (Unless, the prototypes are carefully made, you can't accurately evaluate them.) Finally, DECIDING between a few similar but distinct versions can be highly subjective and time-consuming, especially since the same instrument will sound different in different rooms, etc. Thus, my week-long sprint has turned into a month-long mara-sprint. The end result is turning out better than ever, but it's a lot of work. As my loving wife has reminded me, "If it were easy, everyone would be doing it."

Next week I hope to get this project back in the hands of our mold designer. Sorry I'm not farther along, but we keep making steady progress. Poco a poco, se va lejos.

Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
EriChanHime
30 Aug 2016, 09:59 PM
This is very exciting, as I would love to learn inline playing, and though I've ordered the C & G set from MO, there has been a snag in shipping (tracking says delivered, office never got it, I have nothing). Very distraught, really, as I also ordered several books, and the whole thing has disappeared! I really like the idea of an extended range inline that doesn't require back and forth like a double ocarina. The patent pictures that someone posted a long time ago here show a wonderfully innovative design. I'm definitely on the bandwagon in wanting one of these, particularly if they are priced as much lower from the earlier estimate as it seems they will be.
I am sorry that your order has gone missing. Have you contacted the Post office or Mountain Ocarinas? The number is on their website.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
I am glad that you got your order.

You should find the C Mountain Ocarina to cover the range in about 80-90% of the songs in Hymnals. I will seldom even need to play the B below middle C. With a little practice up to 3 sharps and 3 flats can be played without getting your fingers twisted up in knots, so that will cover most of the Keys in the Hymnals as well.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
It takes a while to get rid of the buzz and hiss. The hardest part for me was playing the B/C hole on the MO. For some reason my Warmstone C is a little easier for me to play the low notes. I don't know if that is due to the material or just a slight production difference.

My ears prefer the lower notes of the C over the G but that is a matter of personal preference.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
The only transverse I own is one of Robert Hickman's Pure alto D's I love the sound of it and it don't have the buzz problem of the MO. I wish my old man wrists could stand to play it for more than a few minutes at a time.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
Here is the latest news from Karl about the new 2 octave ocarina that many of us have been waiting on for so long. This is a copy / paste directly from his forums:

Quote:
 
Where should I begin to try to describe my progress over the last few months?

First, I have to say that I've been having a wonderful time lately playing my accurate (with a bit of expert tweaking) but very expensive 3D printed prototypes. "Pro-Range's" extra range has allowed me to enjoy playing music that I couldn't previously. For instance, I've been playing a lot of gorgeous Turlough O'Carolan tunes that require most or all of "PR's" two-octave range. Delightful, stimulating stuff! (FYI, some time ago I compiled a book to include with "PR" which will introduce you to playing it in a step by step manner. The book has about 66 beautiful tunes, many of them in 2, 3, or even 4 different keys, including a bunch of Carolan tunes.) I'll try to make some sound samples soon. Maybe even a video.

And I'm thinking about posting some photos soon. Up to now, I've been hesitant to post photos for a few reasons. The biggest reason is that this has been a long, ambitious process with many twists and turns, and I wanted to be very close to launch before getting too much excitement going. Along those same lines, the photos would give away the flute's actual name, which I've always planned to reveal at the time of launch. (But you guys wouldn't tell anybody, right?) In addition, as we move through the pre-production process, "PR's" outer appearance has been undergoing slight changes, and I hate to show you inaccurate or underwhelming pictures. In other words, the real thing will look better than my prototypes.

Alright, alright! You've convinced me. After talking it out with you guys (thanks for not interrupting!), I've decided to try to post some photos in the next week or so.

As I believe I've posted before, the challenge has been to take a very complex, precise design, which I first prototyped in hard stable materials such as micarta and then later through precision 3D prints, and adapt it so that we could we could affordably* and precisely reproduce it, so that you could afford to buy it.

(When I say affordably*, I'm referring to per unit costs. The expensive up front costs of development, tooling, and the incredible amount of time I've put into this are... well... they are what they are. When all is said and done, this is the instrument that I've always wanted, the one that I used to wish I could buy somewhere, so we've just kept plugging along through one challenge after another. It's something I believe in.)

So, what's the latest hold up? Well, since my last substantial posting, we've had four sets of precision 3D prints made. Each subsequent print represents changes we have made to improve and test the moldability of our design as much as possible before the tooling is made. To provide an example, we recently made tweaks to a windway assembly so that it would mold more precisely. So far, I have been working with my tool designer to convert this wonderful pocket-sized flute into something that could be precisely injection molded. I have just signed off on the design, so now my mold designer will begin to plan out the actual injection mold with all its features, such as gating, cooling, inserts, etc. He tells me that it will be about two weeks before the mold is designed. Then I get quotes on the tooling, and soon (hopefully) we begin cutting steel. I've already had a few meetings over the last several months with the Connecticut company that I hope to work with to build our tooling and then mold our parts.

In truth, I could have signed off on a mold design a couple of months ago, but I have previous experience with four other sets of molds, and I'm just not willing to settle for a pretty good design. I am determined to have an excellent end result, a precise, concert-quality flute that you'll enjoy playing and carrying with you wherever you go. Despite some popular lore to the contrary, engineering grade plastics can offer several advantages over materials such hardwood, clay, or metal, PROVIDED THAT THERE IS AN EXCELLENT DESIGN AND PRECISE ADHERENCE TO THAT DESIGN. That's what I am after.

By the way, if you've been to the Mountain Ocarinas website recently, you'll notice that we are sold out of all our instruments except for our polycarbonate Gs. Sorry about that! Some time ago I decided to go out on a limb and cease production of our other instruments so that I could focus on "Pro-range." While that's been a challenge because it has reduced our sales quite a bit, I'm excited that we're finally drawing close to the finish line with "pro-range." Did I say the finish line? It's actually the starting line.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
I wanted to let everyone know that Karl posted a few snapshots of a printed prototype of his new Ocarina. If you want to see the pictures check out the forums there. Look on the Something to talk about thread.

Note: the printed model also has the name of the new product on it.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
From what I understand it has 2 airways, and 2 chambers but only one set of holes. I am not sure how that works.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
I took a closer look at the photo, I think you are right. It looks like some sort of split hole type of setup
Edited by Harp Player, 13 Nov 2016, 08:28 AM.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
Thanks for the link I had always wondered about the concept that his product uses.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
I just wanted to let you know the Karl posted some updates about the new CODA. It spans several messages so I will just direct you to the form posts there if you are interested:

http://www.ocarinaboard.com/bb/index.php?topic=2512.210

Note: The update starts close to the bottom of page 15 and spills on to the next page.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
Shinobinlove
30 Mar 2017, 05:12 PM
Does anyone have an actual image of the CODA yet?
He only has pictures of prototype (printed) CODA Ocarinas posted. The mold order has been finalized and ordered the last I head, but it may look slightly different from the printed version.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
Here is the latest update from Karl about the CODA.

Quote:
 

Hi to you faithful Coda followers. I appreciate you, and I understand how frustrating the slow progress (and my infrequent posts) can be. At times, it's terribly hard for me to be patient also. There are just so many little steps in a project like this -- and a frustrating amount of WAITING (and follow up) whenever the ball is in someone else's court.

Here's the latest word from the mold makers: "After running the tooling schedule, I am showing the week of June 19th for the first samples."

Exciting, right? However, now it's time to manage everyone's expectations, including my own.

The first samples that come out of the mold are to test the functionality, cooling, accuracy, etc., of the mold. Ideally, when they first fire up the huge injection molding machine, celestial music will sound, bluebirds will alight on the hopper, and a shaft of golden light will stream through the factory window, illuminating a set of gleaming, perfectly-formed parts as they emerge from the jaws of the gentle giant. (Sigh!!)

More likely, though, since we have striven to be "steel safe," we'll need to tweak one or more aspects of the molds that produce Coda's four precision parts. Steel safe? Well, it's much easier to remove a little bit of steel from a mold surface to bring it into spec than to try to weld and form a tiny feature onto a mold. Anyway, tweaking requires disassembling the mold (big hunks of steel that weigh hundreds of pounds) and, uh... tweaking it. Then you reassemble the mold and try again... Hopefully, there will be nothing major to address since a ton (or more) of careful planning has gone into this so far.

After parts meet with my approval (I'm easy to please, right?Wink), then it's time to send portions of the mold out to a company that specializes in texturing mold surfaces and, finally, to another company that heat treats the mold cavities. Meanwhile, yet another company will be completing the precision horns and fixtures for assembling Coda. So... I'll be attending a lot of meetings, checking progress and quality of a lot of things, and writing a lot of checks. (SIGH!!!!!!)

So, what is a realistic time frame for getting Coda into your hands? Well, if all goes as planned, we could begin sales at the end of July. Yee-haa! That's what I'm striving for. However, I have enough experience with this type of project to expect unexpected challenges. When they come, you just have to roll up your sleeves and work through them. Thus, I'll also be very pleased if we have Coda on the market sometime in August.

That's all for now. Thanks for the kind, patient support. It is encouraging. Also, thanks for the feedback on price. Obviously, I can't always follow everyone's recommendations, but I always read your comments with great interest and learn from them. Tuna asked if supply would be limited at first. In theory, no. Let's see if that is true in practice. Will there ever be a "high-end" version of Coda? Well, if Coda takes off the way we hope it will, then a high-end version is a possibility in the future. Our focus for now, though, is to make an affordable instrument that plays like a high-end one. Tiny, tough, and light, great sound, 2 chromatic octaves, and fluid, intuitive fingering.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
I wanted to let everyone know that Karl has received some sample CODA ocarinas. He is currently testing them to see if the molds need to be tweaked some. If he is happy with them then the next step will be getting them textured which will take about a month.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
A few days ago Karl promised to post some sound samples of the CODA by Saturday (July 22 2017). I am very excited to get to hear the instrument being played.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
I have been checking on the MO site almost every day. Most days it only takes a few seconds, but every now and then something new will be there.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
I don't know the answer to that. I just know that he suspended production of the older models while working on the final stages of the CODA. I know a lot of people would like to be able to purchase the old C and G.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
Here is the latest update from Karl about the CODA. Well it is actually some sound samples instead of information about the instrument. The recordings sound pretty good to me, but Karl in not real happy with the quality so he promises to post more later.


Quote:
 
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B0zhPrS1sbhVVEtjVUMxSlE1RkU

Okay, it 10 past Midnight on Saturday night, so I better slap up some sound samples. I'm not that technically savvy, so hopefully this link to google drive will work for you guys, at least temporarily. Frankly, I'm not real happy with these mediocre recordings, but I forced myself to post them because of my promise. I'll replace them with more and better recordings after I get some audio things figured out. Not having recorded in a long time, I had to set up a recording area in our bedroom, which I'm still tweaking. I think there may be some repeats, but I'm done with it for tonight!

Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
Texture is one of the side effects of the shape of inline Ocarinas. I think that the lower chamber wraps around the higher chamber so that would make it have more texture than the upper. I know that some people like texture more than others. I personally think that texture adds depth and power to the sound, but I know that is subjective and not everyone thinks that way.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
I only have one transverse, it is one of Robert Hickman's 11 hole D's. I love the sound of it and how solid it is along the entire range, but I have a touch of carpel tunnel syndrome so I can't play it for more than a few minutes at a time.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
Here is the latest news about the CODA.

Quote:
 
Well, I've been holding off on posting because I keep hoping to share encouraging news.

Since back in July, I've been expecting parts any day, but issues keep coming up: the tool was still out for hardening, the color concentrate had not arrived yet, etc. As of yesterday, the latest word from the molder is, "Guys are finishing up another job and you are next in line for install. As soon as we are ready I will call so you can come down and see the parts."

In the original quote, we were supposed to have finished parts within 10 to 12 weeks. It's not like I'm counting or anything, but, as of today, 22 weeks have passed since I officially placed an order for the Coda injection mold, and 8 and a half weeks just since we received our first clear sample parts. As you can see, we are running a tiny bit behind.

Of course, this is frustrating, but any really important project requires patience. Hopefully, all the many challenges and delays will soon be a distant, vague memory once we have finished Codas in hand. We've waited this long. I'm at least 98.9% sure that waiting a little longer won't kill us.

As soon as I know anything more, YOU will be the first to know!
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
Here is the latest update from Karl:

Quote:
 

This will just be a quick, big picture update. It is a busy time as we strive to be prepared for the Coda launch on many fronts.

We now have nice production parts (in dark brown), and the texturing came out very nice. If you are not excited about brown either, have no fear! We ran those parts only because we needed to get them ASAP to the ultrasonic welding equipment company so that they could complete work on our horns and fixtures. Without that ultrasonic welding equipment, we can't assemble Coda.

As far as when they will complete their work, the ultrasonic welding guys say, "...delivery [of the tooling] is 1st/2nd week November or ASAP." So, write that on your calendars! It looks like November is the month. And since I am NEVER wrong when I make a prediction... (A song from the Pirates of Penzance springs to mind here. If you don't get this one, you may need to go to a few more high school musicals.)

We finally have the needed color concentrate to make both black and slightly-transparent dark cobalt-blue parts. There were a lot of delays on this because we are working with a type of plastic that neither my molder nor the color concentrate people have worked with before, so you wouldn't believe all we've gone through just to get these color concentrates. (None of the suppliers had the cobalt blue resin, so it is a true custom color, but we could have bought stock black material instead of getting a custom color concentrate made. The only drawback was that we would have had to buy 15,000 or 20,000 pounds of it. Gulp! Hopefully next year!)

I've chosen a plastic called Zylar --a less common, more expensive resin-- because it is very tough, it molds a bit more precisely with less molded-in stress than either polycarbonate or ABS, and it is very safe, i.e., it's suitable for medical devices, reusable drinking ware, etc.

I mention the colors again because I think that two-tone Codas will look classy and more interesting. (The proof is in the pudding, though.) You see, Coda has four components: a top, a middle, a bottom, and a mouthpiece, so we can combine these components in different ways to create Coda Blue, Coda Black, and --for the really hardcore-- Coda Black & Blue. Wink (You are not alone. My wife didn't think that was funny either.)

Gotta run...



It looks like it won't be much longer now.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
Yet another update from Karl

Quote:
 

You guys are great! With all that I have going on, I don't always respond to your posts right away, but I always read them with interest.

Good news! I'll spare you most of the details. I spent the day at the ultrasonic welders yesterday. The new horns and fixtures, after some testing and tweaking, now work really well. This is especially encouraging because we designed and redesigned our joints several times to improve them, but there were still no guarantees, so perhaps you can imagine my relief.

At present, I have about a dozen assembled Codas that look and play nicely. Also, I took one of them and dropped it over and over onto solid concrete from a height of 4 to 6 feet. (We'll do more testing in the future.) Coda bounced every time and kept right on playing. Now, I don't present these as unbreakable, but they are designed with EDC in mind. An EveryDay Carry instrument should be small, light, and TOUGH, and I'm pleased to say that Coda lives up to my expectations.

Also, I was playing Coda at the small plant or factory yesterday, and four employees walked up to say they wanted one (or two). I later learned that one of the company owners took an assembled Coda home because he emailed to ask about the Coda book and to say that a couple of his piano-playing teens wanted Codas. While this is gratifying, the real test comes as we gradually find out how many people are willing to part with money to buy one. Time will tell, but I am optimistic. Whatever the case, this is the instrument that I personally have wanted for the last couple of decades but couldn't buy because it didn't exist.

But when, oh, when will Coda be available? Soon, but how soon? Right now they are doing a final polish of the ultrasonic horns and fixtures. Will they finish this week? Maybe, probably, but they couldn't say. As soon as they finish, I will personally transport the ultrasonic tooling over to the injection molding company. Then they'll have to set up their ultrasonic welder so they can perform the three welds on each set of Coda components. The injection molders are great guys, and they say they'll get "right on it," but is that next week (next week includes Thanksgiving), or the following...? And there are many other details that we are racing to get ready for launch. I say "we," but right now it's mainly me. Very soon, as finances allow, I'll have more help from wonderful people waiting in the wings, but Coda has been a BIG stretch financially, so it's still up to me to spin as many plates as I can.

Thanks again for your extreme patience! I'll keep you in the loop.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
The last I heard about the price is Karl is looking at $60 for the instrument price. He wanted to go with $50 but the cost of getting it to market has made him reconsider a little.

As for the fingering chart Karl is not going to make it available until he is ready to start shipping. He did say it would be slightly different from the regular MO as far as sharps and flats go and that there would be a small amount of overlap between the chambers.

I am no expert on the CODA I have just been following the thread on the MO forums for quite a while now.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
The Coda is getting very close to shipping. The Molders now have the ultrasonic welders and are hopefully producing a quality product.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
The CODA release is getting very close. I got an email from Karl today. Here is hoping for something musical under the tree.
Edited by Harp Player, 17 Dec 2017, 05:59 AM.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
1 user reading this topic (1 Guest and 0 Anonymous)
« Previous Topic · America Continent Ocarinas · Next Topic »
Add Reply



Find us on TwitterFacebook | Read the FAQ