Welcome Guest [Log In] [Register]

- News Ticker

Donations - Please consider donating to The Ocarina Network to keep us afloat. More detail can be found in this topic. •
The Ocarina Network - Serving the ocarina community since April 27th 2008
Welcome to The Ocarina Network, a place for ocarina enthusiasts from all around the globe!

You're currently viewing The Ocarina Network as a guest.

If you join The Ocarina Network, you'll be able to access member-only sections, and use many member-only features such as customizing your profile, sending personal messages, and voting in polls. On top of that we have a great number of music scores and backtracks for you to download.

Registration is simple, fast, and completely free.

Register at The Ocarina Network!

If you're already a member please log into your account to access all of our features:

Username:   Password:
Add Reply
  • Pages:
  • 1
  • 6
Mountain Ocarinas; Quality durable inline ocarinas
Topic Started: 20 Nov 2009, 04:02 PM (24,114 Views)
ubizmo


Mountain Ocarinas are quality inline ocarinas, currently made in the keys of C5 and G5. They are made in several highly durable materials, at different price points: polycarbonate plastic, Corian ("warmstone"), Dymondwood ("hardwood"), and anodized aluminum. Their web site is Mountain Ocarinas.

There's plenty of information at the web site, so I'll just mention a few points that I think are worth emphasizing. First, Mountain Ocarinas is a small, family-owned and run company located in Connecticut. Karl Ahrens, the creator of the MO, and Cliff Hayashida, are the proprietors. Although parts of the MOs are "mass produced," the instruments themselves are not. They are assembled, finished, and tested by hand. Second, it is a principle design goal of MOs that they are "tough enough to take anywhere." There are no MOs made of clay.

I think the web site and Karl's videos at the MO YouTube Channel provide a great deal of information, but I thought there should at least be a topic here at TON for them. I've been playing MOs since September 2008.

Ubizmo
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
kissing
Member Avatar
tyrannical dictator

I am highly surprised that no one has started the Mountain ocarinas topic in the American ocarinas section until now!

They are very good ocarinas that are understated.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Elven Spellmaker
Member Avatar
== Cirno -- Opinionated Baka ==

Very easily portable Ocarinas.

Unique tone, which isn't the first tone I'd like people to hear when I first play them an Ocarina, but its grown on me. :)

The main thing that bugs me about them is the two holes underneath (to fit in with usual transverse Ocarinas) should be reversed.

As my Polycarbonate G is falling apart now (glue is just disappearing in some places), I might upgrade it to a wooden model.

The C Ocarina to me feels more unfinished than the G one does, especially with the "missing" hole.

Overall I am happy with them as they are so easy to travel with, no worries about it swinging and breaking. :)
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
ubizmo


Elven Spellmaker
20 Nov 2009, 06:00 PM
Unique tone, which isn't the first tone I'd like people to hear when I first play them an Ocarina, but its grown on me. :)
You know, that's an interesting point. I've thought about that tone and how it's different. In terms of acoustics, the MO, due to it's shape, has more overtones than the typical transverse. Another way to think of it is that transverse ocarinas (many, but not all) have a more "closed" sound, whereas MOs have a more "open" sound. Obviously, those terms are metaphorical, but they're the best I can do at the moment.

I think many people come to the ocarina expecting, and attracted by, the closed sound. I know I did. The open sound of the MO didn't appeal to me initially. After a few weeks of experimenting, I grew to prefer it; it took a lot longer to be able to control it.

Quote:
 
The main thing that bugs me about them is the two holes underneath (to fit in with usual transverse Ocarinas) should be reversed.


I think I explained in another thread that this is not an arbitrary difference but has a definite reason, namely to allow the ocarina to be supported by both hands on high D, which is more commonly played than D#. At least, that's what I seem to recall Karl saying at some point. Given that, I don't know if it would be a good idea to reverse them just for the sake of conformity.

Quote:
 
As my Polycarbonate G is falling apart now (glue is just disappearing in some places), I might upgrade it to a wooden model.


Whether you upgrade or not, you should have the poly replaced. My poly was banged around in all kinds of weather, but was still in fine condition when I gave it away. I kept it in the car, and it was always falling on the floor, or out on the street, or getting sat on, stepped on, etc.

Quote:
 
The C Ocarina to me feels more unfinished than the G one does, especially with the "missing" hole.


Easy as it is to get that low B on the C MO, I'd also prefer a fingered B.

I have to say that I like the fact that I can wash my MO in water as often as I want. I still use folded paper to clean the windway, but an occasional bath seems to clear out every last speck of dust, and the difference is audible.

Ubizmo
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
David F.
Member Avatar
Will make ocarinas for food!

maybe its just me but does the poly g sound a like it has a real fuzzy like tone ive been playing my sop g and recently piked up my poly c and it sounded really really buzzy! or is it just me!?
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
shirf02
Member Avatar
Enjoys the Disney Renaissance
Yeah, that's the first thing I noticed about MO's sound, it's kinda buzzy. It seems to work well for the kind of music that Ubizmo plays, don't think it would work so well with my style of music however.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Walden
Member Avatar
An humble ocarina-player.
ubizmo
20 Nov 2009, 04:02 PM
Second, it is a principle design goal of MOs that they are "tough enough to take anywhere." There are no MOs made of clay.
The size is good for sticking in a pocket, I hear. Similar to a harmonica.

Posted Image
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
viperdvman
Member Avatar
Fledgling Ocarinist and Floutist
I'm actually pretty interested in getting a hold of a polycarb MO G ocarina either right before or right after I get the Focalink that I'm wanting. I'd love to have an inline to play with, and a durable one that still sounds great too. :)
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
ubizmo


Concerning the tone of the MO, there are two things to remember:

1. It's not going to sound just like a sweet potato oc, ever, because it's designed differently.

2. The sound you get when you first start playing the MO is not the sound you'll get after you've played it for a while. It takes time to achieve the right breath pressure and steadiness to get a clean tone. In fact, I think they actually warn new customers about this.

@Walden -- Yes the G is about the size of a regular harmonica and fits easily in a pocket, or can be worn as a pendant, which is what I do. The C is about the size of a chromatic harmonica. The non-poly models are more visually appealing.

Ubizmo
For those who might be interested, Mountain Ocarinas has just finished a batch of new anodized aluminum ocarinas. The G ocarinas will be available in blue and red, as well as the gold color that they've had all along; the C will continue to be available only in the gold color.

You can see them at:

Aluminum gold C

Aluminum gold G

Aluminum blue G

Aluminum red G

I've never played, or even held, one of these aluminum MOs, but I'm going to get a blue one, and I'll eventually post a review. I'm interested in them for a couple of reasons. One, they have the same tapered mouthpiece that the poly has, which I like. The mouthpiece of the warmstone and hardwood models is more blunt. Given the amount of time I spent playing MOs, these little details matter. Second, these are the heaviest MOs, and I find that a bit more weight makes the instrument more stable in the fingers, especially in the high notes where it's supported by just a couple of fingers and the lips (and again, the tapered mouthpiece helps here). The warmstone is heavier than the poly, and that's one of the things I like about it. The aluminum is heavier than either, so I'll be interested to see whether that's an improvement, or whether it's too heavy.

I expect no significant difference in sound.

Ubizmo
Edited by ubizmo, 1 Dec 2009, 03:09 AM.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
shirf02
Member Avatar
Enjoys the Disney Renaissance
Getting a Warmstone G for chrissy :D
it's going to be fan-folk-tastic :)
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
hirohiigo
Member Avatar
Double Ocarinist x 2
Quote:
 
As my Polycarbonate G is falling apart now (glue is just disappearing in some places), I might upgrade it to a wooden model.

Doesn't Mountain Ocarinas have a lifetime warranty on ocarinas? I remember their site saying that if your ocarina ever breaks they'll replace it for free.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
DavidRamos
Member Avatar


hirohiigo
1 Dec 2009, 03:17 PM
Quote:
 
As my Polycarbonate G is falling apart now (glue is just disappearing in some places), I might upgrade it to a wooden model.

Doesn't Mountain Ocarinas have a lifetime warranty on ocarinas? I remember their site saying that if your ocarina ever breaks they'll replace it for free.
They sure do!
mountainsocarina.com/info.htm
 
4) A Lifetime Guarantee:
We want you to feel free to take your ocarina along with you. Therefore, if one of your MOUNTAIN OCARINAS® ever becomes inoperable due to accidental damage, we will replace it free of charge with an ocarina of similar value.


I love those aluminum ocs! I think the brass/gold gives the impression that it's of a more professional caliber.

And @hirohiigo - I totally just noticed this, but why on earth is :link: playing a pan-flute instead of an :ocarina: in your sig?!?! :shakefist:
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
sirhalos
Member Avatar


Zelda plays a Pan Flute in Spirit Tracks which comes out in a few days.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
ForestsRequiem
Member Avatar
Formerly Ocarinaman333

I really want to try one of their more expensive Ocarinas!

I love my Poly G, and I need to splurge and start buying the things I want(including a MountainC)!
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
hirohiigo
Member Avatar
Double Ocarinist x 2
DavidRamos
1 Dec 2009, 08:14 PM
hirohiigo
1 Dec 2009, 03:17 PM

Quoting limited to 2 levels deep
They sure do!
mountainsocarina.com/info.htm
 
4) A Lifetime Guarantee:
We want you to feel free to take your ocarina along with you. Therefore, if one of your MOUNTAIN OCARINAS® ever becomes inoperable due to accidental damage, we will replace it free of charge with an ocarina of similar value.


I love those aluminum ocs! I think the brass/gold gives the impression that it's of a more professional caliber.

And @hirohiigo - I totally just noticed this, but why on earth is :link: playing a pan-flute instead of an :ocarina: in your sig?!?! :shakefist:
That's one of the main reasons I want to get a Mountain Oc. They sound nice, but that great of service is a good way of attracting me.

And, Link is playing a pan flute because that's what he plays in Spirit Tracks. :) And because I adore the picture.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
DavidRamos
Member Avatar


sirhalos
1 Dec 2009, 09:07 PM
Zelda plays a Pan Flute in Spirit Tracks which comes out in a few days.
Seriously? They just ditched the Oc?! Please observe my emotional reaction...

:/
-_-
:omg:
:mad:
:rain:
:cry:
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Weisty
Member Avatar
Double Ocarinist
Zelda thats not cool. Anyways what is the difference in sound quality from the polycarbon to the more exspence ones? I really want the soprano and alto combo.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
ubizmo


Weisty
1 Dec 2009, 11:52 PM
Zelda thats not cool. Anyways what is the difference in sound quality from the polycarbon to the more exspence ones? I really want the soprano and alto combo.
I haven't played an aluminum MO yet. I have polycarbonate and warmstone MOs in G, and a hardwood in C. I used to have a poly C as well, but gave it away to someone in need.

The bottom line is: The difference in sound between the materials is very, very subtle. I like to think that I can hear some difference, but the fact is that I've sometimes listened to my own recorded sound and been unable to remember which one I was playing, and I couldn't tell by listening. Expecting a significant difference in sound is really not a good reason to upgrade from a poly. The non-poly MOs are much more visually attractive than the polys, and different in other ways that can affect playability, such as weight and mouthpiece shape. Also, the aluminum MO, like the poly, has recessed thumb holes. Current hardwood and warmstone models don't. Some won't care about these details; others will.

@David -- I also had the idea that the brass/gold looks more professional, but for some reason the electric blue just caught my eye.

Ubizmo
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
DavidRamos
Member Avatar


ubizmo
2 Dec 2009, 01:08 AM
@David -- I also had the idea that the brass/gold looks more professional, but for some reason the electric blue just caught my eye.
And the red one caught mine, but I think I'm getting the gold anyway, lol.

During my last 3 years on Youtube, I've had one goal in mind: to prove to the western world that the ocarina is more than a toy or collector's item from a video game, but fully functional, beautiful, and serious musical instrument. As cool as I think the red one looks, I just think it would benefit my efforts if I went with the brass look. But who knows...one day, I might get the urge to collect all 3 :D
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Cabasho
Beginner
i also like the red one, but i own both of the poly ocarinas =P (black color also caught my eye)

i like the sound of both, but preffer the poly C

i also think it is a little bit difficult to get used to it, i used to have a clay ocarina (till it broke -_-') and kind of took me like 2 weeks to get used to the fingering of the MO's

bout the sound... i cant say much from my expirience since i'm NOT a great performer but from the videos i've seen in youtube, the diference in sound between poly, aluminium, and the others is almost non
Edited by Cabasho, 21 Dec 2009, 10:00 PM.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
viperdvman
Member Avatar
Fledgling Ocarinist and Floutist
I've heard so much good about Mountain Ocarinas, especially how their polycarb's one of the highest quality plastics out there. I do like how all their other inlines look, though. Their Aluminum ones with their satin finish and their Warmstones look especially nice.

In the future, I might go for one of their other materials :) But for now, the Polycarb in G is in my signature list of "Future Ocarinas" :D
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
kissing
Member Avatar
tyrannical dictator

Yup, as the others have stated, the sound difference between polycarbonate and their more costly models is quite subtle.

I was able to compare a Warmstone G and C with the Polycarbonate G and C and saw no significant difference. Being very fussy, I recall the Warmstones sounding a bit clearer and firmer, while the polycarbs may have sounded a tad whispy and crispy. But it was very subtle.

That aside, their high end models certainly do look way more visually appealing and would feel a bit heftier to hold. They are definitely worth it if you really cherish Mountain ocarinas. They are a good deal on such well crafted, pretty little instruments with a big sound.
DavidRamos
1 Dec 2009, 11:28 PM
sirhalos
1 Dec 2009, 09:07 PM
Zelda plays a Pan Flute in Spirit Tracks which comes out in a few days.
Seriously? They just ditched the Oc?! Please observe my emotional reaction...

:/
-_-
:omg:
:mad:
:rain:
:cry:
LOL Maybe its time for us to start playing the panflute instead.

I can already see it... TPN or PU :pirate:
Edited by kissing, 22 Dec 2009, 10:38 AM.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Armisis
Member Avatar
Paradoxical Enigma

Someone needs to educate Nintendo and Link....

As for MO, they have the Al ones back in stock in a few different colors, I got a blue one quite nice, I have to admit out of the square voice hole ocs i have only MO and Dunster seem to have it done right, Terry Riley still uses it on his and its not quite got it right IMHO and John Langley has switched to round voice holes. I think MO has the voice hole right because of how its tooled and setup in a way that is easy to replicate in his making....

Dave
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Jafafa Hots
Member Avatar
Old. Just really, really old. Also tired.
Armisis
22 Dec 2009, 12:16 PM
Someone needs to educate Nintendo and Link....

As for MO, they have the Al ones back in stock in a few different colors, I got a blue one quite nice, I have to admit out of the square voice hole ocs i have only MO and Dunster seem to have it done right, Terry Riley still uses it on his and its not quite got it right IMHO and John Langley has switched to round voice holes. I think MO has the voice hole right because of how its tooled and setup in a way that is easy to replicate in his making....

Dave
how would you say the terry rileys are not quite right? I'm very interested in his doubles...
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
terryriley


Armisis
22 Dec 2009, 12:16 PM
Someone needs to educate Nintendo and Link....

As for MO, they have the Al ones back in stock in a few different colors, I got a blue one quite nice, I have to admit out of the square voice hole ocs i have only MO and Dunster seem to have it done right, Terry Riley still uses it on his and its not quite got it right IMHO and John Langley has switched to round voice holes. I think MO has the voice hole right because of how its tooled and setup in a way that is easy to replicate in his making....

Dave
Armisis:
ahah, the rectangular versus the round fipple argument surfaces again!
I use rectangular fipples on my single chamber instruments and emphasise that they should be played with a very gentle, constant blow. They are ideal for playing indoors. I do make some twin chamber instruments with rectangular fipples and they are better for playing indoors or for use with gentle amplification during performances BUT my twelve hole instruments and my performing twin chambers for musicians all have round or oval fipples which enables them to be played with a much stronger blow - much closer to the blow you would use when playing a flute.
Terry Riley
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
viperdvman
Member Avatar
Fledgling Ocarinist and Floutist
kissing
22 Dec 2009, 10:23 AM
LOL Maybe its time for us to start playing the panflute instead.

I can already see it... TPN or PU :pirate:
I've actually been interested in playing a panflute since before Spirit Tracks was even thought of. It is what Peter Pan plays in the Disney movie...which is where I found out what a panflute looked like. I've known they were a type of wind instrument since I was a young kid (same time I learned what an ocarina was)

But yeah, some Zelda fans might actually get into the panflute. I can certainly credit the Zelda series for getting people interested in various instruments.
Edited by viperdvman, 23 Dec 2009, 11:16 AM.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Armisis
Member Avatar
Paradoxical Enigma

terryriley
22 Dec 2009, 04:34 PM
Armisis
22 Dec 2009, 12:16 PM
Someone needs to educate Nintendo and Link....

As for MO, they have the Al ones back in stock in a few different colors, I got a blue one quite nice, I have to admit out of the square voice hole ocs i have only MO and Dunster seem to have it done right, Terry Riley still uses it on his and its not quite got it right IMHO and John Langley has switched to round voice holes. I think MO has the voice hole right because of how its tooled and setup in a way that is easy to replicate in his making....

Dave
Armisis:
ahah, the rectangular versus the round fipple argument surfaces again!
I use rectangular fipples on my single chamber instruments and emphasise that they should be played with a very gentle, constant blow. They are ideal for playing indoors. I do make some twin chamber instruments with rectangular fipples and they are better for playing indoors or for use with gentle amplification during performances BUT my twelve hole instruments and my performing twin chambers for musicians all have round or oval fipples which enables them to be played with a much stronger blow - much closer to the blow you would use when playing a flute.
Terry Riley
Ah thank you for that info, it does make sense as they are great oc's and with your time making them I fully understand where your coming from in your choice to form them this way on the 6 hole oc's ect...

Dave

Now back to the topic of this thread... MO....

Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Abreu
Member Avatar
The guy from Brazil

I've been considering buying a poly g... I'll travel to the USA on february, is there any chance to find them on a music sotre?
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
ubizmo


Abreu
23 Dec 2009, 05:43 PM
I've been considering buying a poly g... I'll travel to the USA on february, is there any chance to find them on a music sotre?
Unlikely. Mountain Ocarinas no longer sells wholesale to retail stores. You have to buy them online, either from Mountain directly or on Ebay. But if you're in the US long enough, you could save a chunk of money on shipping by ordering while you're here.

Ubizmo
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Abreu
Member Avatar
The guy from Brazil

I'll saty there for like, 10 days, I think...
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
ubizmo


Abreu
23 Dec 2009, 06:41 PM
I'll saty there for like, 10 days, I think...
If you'll be at one address the whole time, and not moving around touring, that's definitely enough time to order a Mountain ocarina and have it shipped to you.

You can order from Mountain Ocarinas.

Ubizmo
Edited by ubizmo, 23 Dec 2009, 08:20 PM.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Abreu
Member Avatar
The guy from Brazil

Thanks Ubizmo, I'll consider it :D
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
mikona
Member Avatar
Know-Nothing Neebie (see blog)
I got a set of the two polycarb ocarinas for Christmas this year. I've been playing with them a bit. It didn't take me too long to learn the fingerings, since they're fairly similar to transverse... it's just messing with me a bit with how to play an F#, when I switch between ocarinas. They're quite fun though!
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
kissing
Member Avatar
tyrannical dictator

Well I use the same fingering for F# between 12-holes and Mountains.

The 2 significant differences I see is playing Bb and the high D and E (where you have to open the different thumbholes first)

Nevertheless enjoy!
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
speckles
Member Avatar
I’ve been hypnotized

Armisis
22 Dec 2009, 12:16 PM
I have to admit out of the square voice hole ocs i have only MO and Dunster seem to have it done right, Terry Riley still uses it on his and its not quite got it right IMHO
I have a MO polycarbonate C, and IMO, the sound is rather harsh. When I first tooted on it, my mom pronounced, "It's awful!" To be fair, I tend to blow softly, and the MOs are meant for harder breath pressure. But I still don't care for the sound when I blow it harder. :(
I have one of Terry Riley's little egg-sized ocs, amd it has a very sweet, clear sound.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Ocarinadiva
Member Avatar
Play what makes you happy. - Achint

You know, I wasn't sure what to think when I first starting playing either, but after seeing what Ubizmo has been able to do with the MO, I'm convinced that it just takes some experimentation with different breath pressure and lots of practice to get the best results, just like with any other oc.

I played Ogawa ocs for many years, and I was so used to type 1 breath requirements that when I first got my Purple Clay double, I couldn't get a good sound with it. But after about two weeks of messing around with it constantly, I was much happier with it. Preference is a big part of it though. If you don't like ocarinas with textured tones, you're probably better off with that egg shaped pendant or a transverse with even breath requirements.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
junfanjohn
Member Avatar
junfanjohn
I enjoyed your "Women of Ireland" song Ubizmo! Has me thinking of picking one up as well.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
viperdvman
Member Avatar
Fledgling Ocarinist and Floutist
I've only played 2 ocarinas so far: My Langley Songstone and my WPN Double AC. Both require differing breath pressures to get the best sound from them/ SO I've never played one with even breath requirements... not yet, anyway.

From what I'm hearing about the MO's, I think I should find it fairly easy to convert to those when I get my hands on one :)
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
SasquatchBob
Beginner
Mr. Ubizmo is to be commended for the time he has put in to take his playing on the MO to a high level.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
ubizmo


SasquatchBob
31 Dec 2009, 02:11 PM
Mr. Ubizmo is to be commended for the time he has put in to take his playing on the MO to a high level.
Aww shucks.

You know, it's really just a matter of making a decision and then committing to it. When I first got the poly MO, I wasn't thrilled with the sound either. For that reason, I switched to transverse. But I wasn't that pleased with them either, for various reasons. I listened to Karl Ahrens and Al Martino playing MOs on Youtube and like the sound, and decided that if they could do it, so could I. And that was my turning point. I'm not there yet, but I've made progress--probably more than I would have made if I kept switching ocarinas every month or so.

Before I played any ocarina, I tried playing tin whistle for a while. I fell into the trap of buying whistle after whistle, trying to find the perfect one, blaming the whistles for my lousy sound. I finally realized that buying whistles is just a distraction from playing them. The great advantage of the MO for me is that I have it with me all the time, and as a result I play it a lot more than I would if I had to keep it stored at home. I don't worry about breaking it, getting it wet, or anything else. I don't even have to take it out of a case. So when I get the urge to play, I just play.

I don't try to persuade anyone to play MOs. There are lots of great ocarinas out there, and people have different musical preferences, playing styles, and lifestyles. The MO is a good fit for me. The only point I try to make is not to be too quick in judging the sound you get when you first start playing one. It changes over time, as you learn to control your breath. I'm sure this is true for all ocarinas, but I think it's a bit more true of MOs than some other ocarinas.

Ubizmo
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Vermin
Member Avatar
O·ca·ri·na - pla·ying - an·droid
That mountain ocarina learning book, is that useful for people who already have clarinet lessons?
I've already learned to read sheet music, and I'm learning about meters and rythm during my clarinet lessons...
I like the Mountain Ocarina playing style, but will I also learn about that?
With the MO playing style, I'm refering to the way Karl plays on the ocarina guru video.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
ubizmo


Vermin
6 Jan 2010, 05:06 PM
That mountain ocarina learning book, is that useful for people who already have clarinet lessons?
I've already learned to read sheet music, and I'm learning about meters and rythm during my clarinet lessons...
I like the Mountain Ocarina playing style, but will I also learn about that?
With the MO playing style, I'm refering to the way Karl plays on the ocarina guru video.
I don't have the book, so I'm not sure, but I think it's mainly about learning fingering and reading music. The playing style you're referring to involves what's called "Celtic ornamentation", which is what Karl uses with great effect. He has some videos about it. You can also learn more about it on Youtube by viewing some instructional tin whistle videos, since this sort of ornamentation is fundamental to whistle playing. It mostly involves the use of three basic techniques: cuts, taps (also called strikes), and rolls. Research those and you'll be on your way.

Ubizmo
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Vermin
Member Avatar
O·ca·ri·na - pla·ying - an·droid
That should help me, even before I get my MOs, which I probably won't be able to order untill march anyway.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
esile567
Member Avatar
ヘ(^^ヘ)(ノ^^)ノ
I love my MO! :) I got it a few months ago, but i havent used it that much. Until today! :) I recommend to transfer tin-whilste-techniques(or maybe its common techniques for any flute) to the MO, its very fun and rewarding! :)

Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Sigurthr
Member Avatar
Flutist and Ham Radio Operator. Talarðu Íslenska?

I just ordered a Poly C! I just want an Oc I can take everywhere, and I mean EVERYWHERE. I'll have to learn inline fingering, but hey cant be that hard right?

I made a fall/crush/vibration/shock proof case for my Songbird 5-hole OoT, but it is heavy as hell, Lol. Cuts down the portability a ton.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
1 user reading this topic (1 Guest and 0 Anonymous)
Go to Next Page
« Previous Topic · America Continent Ocarinas · Next Topic »
Add Reply
  • Pages:
  • 1
  • 6



Find us on TwitterFacebook | Read the FAQ