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Ocarinas in the Middle Ages; Were Ocarinas around during the Medieval
Topic Started: 28 May 2009, 02:06 AM (1,978 Views)
JaredChacon
Inline Ocarinist x 5
I heard that Ocarinas were first used by the Aztecs and the Chinese a long time ago, and eventually Giuseppe Donati made the sweet potato ocarina and before that, ocarinas had a very short range and were no more than toys. But the sweet potato was invented way after the medieval days. So were Ocarinas around during the middle ages in Europe? or not? If they were, then what were they like?
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Tsukasa1991
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Dave Shif!
hmm i dont know really. I know a lot of woodwinds were obviously and i have seen them played at Renaissance faires in all shapes and sizes. The standard 12 hole might be a little more modernized but im sure that they must have been around. at any rate i include them in my pnp RPGs set in medieval ages >.< FTW! :TON:
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Ian McConnell
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Transverse Ocarinist x 4
The Gemshorn whas a fipple flute kind of like an ocarina, same basic idea anyway. Clay ones go back to at least 1450 according to wiki, but I think the idea could be much older. I have a 9 hole clay made by Claudio Colombo that is one of my favorites. Clay works way better for these, moisture from playing the "real" horn models makes them go out of tune unless they are sealed. wiki link
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chipsmusik1
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Focalinker!
around year 1100, there were ocarinas shaped like birds in Russia. They've been around sweden for about 250 years. They're not tuned at all.

They look like this:
Spoiler: click to toggle
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killbob234
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The Pied Piper
That looks like the Alladin ocarina Moonsyne made a post of!
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Krešimir Cindrić


Some say that ocarina is more than 12000 years old (look it up on wikipedia).

But, before mid 19th century, ocarinas were usually very simple instruments with very limited range and mostly out of tune. Gemshorn is an exception to this generalization, being a widely spread and frequently used instrument in the Renaissance and early Baroque periods.

Ocarinas made by Giuseppe Donati from Budrio (1836–1925) are the first modern 10-hole ocarina. His technique making of ocarina was succeeded by the great Cesare Vicinelli. Today, similar ocarinas are made by Fabio Menaglio.

However, in the 20th century, the evolution of ocarina continued beyond the works of the great Italian masters, most notable feature being the introduction of 2 additional holes (12-hole ocarinas). And, of course, one must not forget the invention of the English pendant by John Taylor in 1963.
Edited by Krešimir Cindrić, 30 May 2009, 02:34 PM.
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Ocarinaplaya
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Ocarina tutor
If taking a course in College Music History is any consolation, from what I can say; ocarinas have possibly been around since the caveman started to develope his intellect (albeit they needed to develope singing first to understand any other kind of music). Since ocarinas have been around since Aztec times, it can only be conferred that it could've been made during the late times before a record of history was ever kept. :inline: :3

It is entirely possible for the ocarina to have been present during medievel times. Church music and vocal choirs were the norm in medievel times(mostly Gregorian Chant), but woodwinds where slowly gaining popularity and were used to play more secular music (which pissed off the Catholics who deemed instrumental music as blasphemy).

The ocarina may have been accessable from early trading with China which would allow English countries to enjoy them.

I don't know too many details, but I'll leave ya'll to decern whether my facts are fictious or true. :?
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Ignition
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The Ugly
I just found this image on the web, the card says "Inizio *900" seems to mean "Beginning *900"
I'm guessing that means complex Ocarinas were around before the Middle Ages.
Some Italian speaking person please translate this for us all!
Attached to this post:
Attachments: bologna_maparam.jpg (70.02 KB)
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Krešimir Cindrić


This means from the 1900s. :D
This is a double Vicinelli ocarina (I would kill to have it). Cesare Vicinelli from Budrio (1878-1964) was the greatest ocarina maker of all times.

There haven't been any double ocarinas in 900s. But even so, it's a nice find.
Edited by Krešimir Cindrić, 9 Jun 2009, 05:35 AM.
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Ignition
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The Ugly
Aah, that makes sense. Why is it stated *900?
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Krešimir Cindrić


It's usual practice in some non-English speaking countries to abbreviate 1955 as '955, whereas more common abbreviation would be '55. It seems to be quite common in Italy (it's also occasionally used in Croatia, where I'm from).
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Ignition
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The Ugly
Interesting! Thanks for the explanation!
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