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Takashi DAC compared to purple clay STL double; Trying to compare and decide which ocarina to go with as my next
Topic Started: 9 Feb 2018, 06:19 PM (254 Views)
budoc
Inline Ocarinist
Hey everyone, I'm hoping to get some opinions and shared experiences with both the Takashi DAC as well as the purple clay STL double ocarina. I have heard great things about both and understand that they are both high quality instruments. I've heard recordings on YouTube from Cris Gale playing various tunes and also by Kuolong Pan playing The Swan, but recordings I've heard of both have reverb effects which seems to provide a less than accurate sound of what you'll be getting. I think they both sound clear yet have a warmth to them, however.

Can I get opinions and insights from any fellow ocarinists who have had both ocarinas or even one?

Thanks everybody :) :double:
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Soren
Member Avatar
Transverse Ocarinist
I have never played a purple clay TNG ocarina, but I do own and play a Takashi DAC.

I highly recommend the Takashi. It is an expertly made ocarina, made custom for the purchaser. The tone is clear, the breath pressure is comfortable and easy for in-tune playing, and the balance between chambers is wonderful. I have not tried many professional ocarinas, but I do not think there could be much more improvement above my Takashi DAC. It is, to me, a near-perfect ocarina. This may in part be due to some matches with my preferences in sound, though. Some people prefer a more breathy or mellow sound. My Takashi ocarina has a very clear tone, which is what I prefer. I also like the "solo" breath slope, with rising air flow from low to high. The dynamic effect this has on the music is of importance to me.
Visually, I have always had a preference for the shaping of Takashi ocarinas with smoke firing, but this is highly subjective to opinion. Takashi ocarinas are coated in a varnish (I believe it is a natural palm wax) that gives a glossy appearance I find appealing, but I do notice that my lips have a tendency to stick at times during chamber shifts. The TNG double has no surface coat, as far as I am aware, and I have heard that the raw fired clay has little to no tendency to stick to the lips, making chamber shifts more smooth and simple.
My Takashi DAC is fairly light-weight and fits my hands comfortably. It is obvious that much consideration went into the ergonomics of this instrument, and I find it a near ideal fit for me.

I wish I could compare the two ocarinas in question so this assessment was not one-sided. As is probably obvious, I really like my Takashi DAC.
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budoc
Inline Ocarinist
Soren
9 Feb 2018, 09:01 PM
I have never played a purple clay TNG ocarina, but I do own and play a Takashi DAC.

I highly recommend the Takashi. It is an expertly made ocarina, made custom for the purchaser. The tone is clear, the breath pressure is comfortable and easy for in-tune playing, and the balance between chambers is wonderful. I have not tried many professional ocarinas, but I do not think there could be much more improvement above my Takashi DAC. It is, to me, a near-perfect ocarina. This may in part be due to some matches with my preferences in sound, though. Some people prefer a more breathy or mellow sound. My Takashi ocarina has a very clear tone, which is what I prefer. I also like the "solo" breath slope, with rising air flow from low to high. The dynamic effect this has on the music is of importance to me.
Visually, I have always had a preference for the shaping of Takashi ocarinas with smoke firing, but this is highly subjective to opinion. Takashi ocarinas are coated in a varnish (I believe it is a natural palm wax) that gives a glossy appearance I find appealing, but I do notice that my lips have a tendency to stick at times during chamber shifts. The TNG double has no surface coat, as far as I am aware, and I have heard that the raw fired clay has little to no tendency to stick to the lips, making chamber shifts more smooth and simple.
My Takashi DAC is fairly light-weight and fits my hands comfortably. It is obvious that much consideration went into the ergonomics of this instrument, and I find it a near ideal fit for me.

I wish I could compare the two ocarinas in question so this assessment was not one-sided. As is probably obvious, I really like my Takashi DAC.
Hey, thank you so much for replying. I appreciate all of the information. That all sounds every good to me. I like the excellent chamber balance and clear tone as well as the ergonomic advantage as well.

I currently have a songbird sweet potato double ac - regular version. The chamber balance is decent, but I definitely hear a difference in texture and tonal quality between chambers. I like the very clear tone of the songbird double I have, but I would like a little more warmth too. I think the Takashi sounds warmer, but I can't tell for sure. From what I understand the Takashi would be a pretty big upgrade from the regular songbird double I currently have.

Thanks again for the information!
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