Welcome Guest [Log In] [Register]

- News Ticker

Donations - Please consider donating to The Ocarina Network to keep us afloat. More detail can be found in this topic.
The Ocarina Network - Serving the ocarina community since April 27th 2008
Welcome to The Ocarina Network, a place for ocarina enthusiasts from all around the globe!

You're currently viewing The Ocarina Network as a guest.

If you join The Ocarina Network, you'll be able to access member-only sections, and use many member-only features such as customizing your profile, sending personal messages, and voting in polls. On top of that we have a great number of music scores and backtracks for you to download.

Registration is simple, fast, and completely free.

Register at The Ocarina Network!

If you're already a member please log into your account to access all of our features:

Username:   Password:
Add Reply
Convincing music store NOT to sell crap ocarinas XD
Topic Started: 14 Apr 2017, 02:36 PM (453 Views)
spoonyspork
Member Avatar
L'il Tooter
So after kiddo and I's music lessons yesterday, kiddo needed the next book level so we bought from the store part of the place. I got to talking to the owner, and asked if he ever carries ocarinas. He said that funny enough, he'd just special ordered one for someone! I was like 'Awesome! What'd they get?'

He showed me. It was that freakin Dadi. Uuugh.

I mentioned you could get SO much better for just a little more. His response was 'Oh it was just a kid who wanted one cause of Zelda. No one is gunna pay more than a couple dollars for a fake instrument'

D:<

I shrugged and said I got my ocarinas because of the game and learned everything about music thanks to starting with a nice one, and let it drop.

Anyone have any ideas for convincing a music store that it's worth having something even just a little more expensive so 'kids' can have a chance at actually playing a real instrument? I was thinking of taking my Night by Noble next time and showing him, but not sure if that would be... I donno... too passive-aggressive, or something? XD
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
kissing
Member Avatar
tyrannical dictator

It might be a bit difficult given the niche nature of ocarinas.
Even if they got some of the best ocarinas into store, I imagine they'd have a hard time selling it as it is not well known in the mainstream community.

It is a shame - my local music store only has junk too - cheapo unplayable plastics and Schwarz clay ocarinas

Though there is hope.
Just a few years ago, it was hard to find good quality ukuleles in music stores.. but now they are growing in popularity, there are lots of better quality options.


And some music stores in Asian countries like Korea, Japan and Taiwan do have quite an OK selection of ocarinas.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
spoonyspork
Member Avatar
L'il Tooter
kissing
14 Apr 2017, 02:47 PM
It might be a bit difficult given the niche nature of ocarinas.
Even if they got some of the best ocarinas into store, I imagine they'd have a hard time selling it as it is not well known in the mainstream community.

Though there is hope.
Just a few years ago, it was hard to find good quality ukuleles in music stores.. but now they are growing in popularity, there are lots of better quality options.

And some music stores in Asian countries like Korea, Japan and Taiwan do have quite an OK selection of ocarinas.
Funny enough... they have *really, really* nice ukes! Kiddo is currently saving up for one. They have a whole section dedicated to them right in the middle of the store, and sell at least one a week (the nicer ones fly off the shelves, while their cheapies sit there, week after week... hrm...)
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
kissing
Member Avatar
tyrannical dictator

Indeed - I have noticed a big change in the ukulele market.

When I first got into ukes a few years back, the only way I could get decent ones was to order from a website in Hawaii (Hawaii Music Supply) - pay a fortune for international shipping and wait almost a month!

I haven't had to order an ukulele from overseas in a while, because great options are now showing up closer to home.

Perhaps one day we can hope that the ocarina follows suit.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
hylian_shieldmaiden
Member Avatar
Can't settle on an avatar pic.
spoonyspork
14 Apr 2017, 02:51 PM
They have a whole section dedicated to them right in the middle of the store, and sell at least one a week (the nicer ones fly off the shelves, while their cheapies sit there, week after week... hrm...)
Maybe you could use this to your advantage if you decide to try and convince them to stock ocarinas? Show them what a real ocarina is capable of, and maybe they'd be willing to get some better ones in stock :)
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
CFWhitman
Initiate
A good plastic ocarina is such a small investment, that if they were going to carry any ocarina, it might as well be a decent one. However, it doesn't sound as though they have any current intentions of carrying one.

It seems that they will only special order an ocarina, and when special ordering, they should of course go the direction the customer wants. However, the customer should make an informed decision (which they usually don't when it comes to ocarinas). If I were working in a music store and someone wanted to special order an instrument with which I was not very familiar, I would offer to research the matter first so that I could give them appropriate choices. Of course, I don't assume any particular type of instrument is just a "toy" instrument without researching the matter first, even if it were an instrument with well known toy examples (but I wouldn't bring that part up to the music store owner).

Hearing is believing, so if I felt confident enough to be able to demonstrate that an ocarina is not exclusively a toy, I might try to find a way to demonstrate it tactfully (and casually). Of course, this would mean waiting until I had a legitimate other reason to go back to the music store. I think my approach would be to bring a very serious version of the instrument, as long as I could play it well and be confident it wouldn't get broken, and perhaps let the owner see it so it might come up in the conversation, or tactfully bring it up and then show it if that seemed better. Then I would do a brief demonstration if the owner seemed amenable to hearing it, just enough to show the potential of the instrument.

Alternatively (or perhaps supplementally), I might have a tablet with me with a few serious videos of ocarina playing to demonstrate. A couple of Cyrille Mercadier videos, perhaps, because of the context, and also some other videos of top players at least available.

Of course, if the proprietor is the type who doesn't think of any keyless woodwinds as serious instruments, then you would be fighting an uphill battle, and it might be best not to push it, even tactfully. But if he thinks of recorders, fifes, tin whistles, and bamboo flutes as serious instruments, then there is no reason he shouldn't consider ocarinas serious as well.
Edited by CFWhitman, 14 Apr 2017, 08:35 PM.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
spoonyspork
Member Avatar
L'il Tooter
Yeah... that's the thing that annoys me most. Doesn't really matter if they *carry* them or not, but for someone to come in and ask about an instrument, and the guy just assumed they were a toy and just got the cheapest one that only re-enforces that assumption. Ugh :/

I'm there every week (kiddo and I take lessons there), so lots of reasons to be there. Not so many to randomly play an ocarina though, without seeming passive-aggressive or like I'm trying to sell my stuff (not at all: I'd love to push Cris Gale's method book package on them though, as at least it'd come with a legit ocarina XD )

I have many lovely ocarinas to play, in lots of keys and up to triple. Have a few songs I play well enough from my head, but donno what might impress a music store guy. He's a German guy who mostly does hard rock, and grew up playing violin.

They have very few woodwinds - guitars and drums are their bread and butter - though they carry recorders (plastic yamahas) and cheapie tin whistles. Also have some really obscure instruments.... the didgeridoo being the first thing that pops into my head. They also keep a small stock of keyed flutes, saxophones.... the usual stuff.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Kae
Transverse Ocarinist x 3
Honestly if he gets the customer a bad product it's like giving bad advice. He could potentially lose trust and support from his customers because they trusted him to help them select a product and he instead went the cheap route because he himself was uninformed which I feel should be considered part of his job. I agree the customer should do research but sometimes information is limited to younger people and he had the resources to be informed.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Bobbie
ocarinas & etc
Our local music store is Sam Ash, which is a national chain in the U.S.. If you search for "ocarina" at their national website at www.SamAsh.com, you retrieve Hal Leonard's "Ocarina Method" book... but no ocarinas!

In comparison, Sam Ash carries a strong line of ukes, including the small piccolo (or soprano) uke, and even the larger uke (bass uke?).
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
kissing
Member Avatar
tyrannical dictator

Bobbie
15 Apr 2017, 12:24 PM
If you search for "ocarina" at their national website at www.SamAsh.com, you retrieve Hal Leonard's "Ocarina Method" book... but no ocarinas!
That Hal Leonard book was written by OcarinaDiva (Cris) who is a great ocarina performer and member of TON :)
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
pandorado100
Member Avatar
Premium Poster
If only he carried the Focalink plastic AC. That is really inexpensive and a good ocarina to boot.

That Dadi plastic, well I would rather play an Ocarina of Crap. It looks nicer.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Kitten Forest
Member Avatar
Double Ocarinist
I went to a music store once when I was getting something for my viola, and I had my ocarina with me (this was when the initial excitement was still there and I wouldn't let it leave me) and I asked if they had any. Of course they only had First Note and Doon ocarinas, so I played mine and showed them how much I like it and how easy it is. While the person agreed that the market wasn't large enough to start carrying them, I hope it made some kind of impression. This happened twice actually, once at Long and McQuade (basically the only music store across Canada), and once at a local folk instrument shop. I will say with certainty that smaller stores are much more open to it, although I think they still sell only cheap clear plastic ocarinas. I live in an area known across Canada for being very slow to catch up to the times, and I still can't find the new method book anywhere! Most chain music stores tend to focus more on guitar and/or orchestra instruments, so it is rather difficult to talk to people there, but I think location plays a huge role. Places along the west coast of North America, or parts of Asia probably would have stores sell good ocarinas much faster than North America's east or Western Europe.

In the end, the only real advice I have would be to show off an affordable ocarina you like, and maybe share information on whoever makes/sells ocarinas in your area, so Songbird and STL if you live in the US. Also, if you have any independant video game stores around, you could ask them too. One in my area used to sell STL's old plastic Ocarina of Time, but they got the idea that clay was better and now sell (very overpriced) cheaper ones you see on ebay. I think a video game store would benefit from carrying a good Zelda replica more than a music store would sell ocarinas just because not many people know them as an instrument yet as you mentioned.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Daniel
Member Avatar
Double Ocarinist x 2
You could gift them with a Night by Noble and Cris's method book ;) Or maybe give them a directory of ocarina websites (including TON) in case anyone is interested.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
I took my MOC to a music store not long after I started playing, and the owner had never even heard of the Ocarina. Sadly that store has now shut down. It seems that the only music stores around now are used instruments and the Chain stores.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Pori
Member Avatar
A. Nony Mouse
I very much agree. I never exactly played the ocarina as a kid, but it did help me a lot learning to play by ear. know that Sam Ash only carries this $20 plastic ocarina, but I know they could get better for the same price.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Gemstone
Member Avatar
more practicing would be nice
In the music store I visited for my mum's new recorder there has been an ocarina on display recently. It was stamped with something along the lines of "originale di Budrio". Could be one from Fabio Menaglio? I didn't dare to ask about it because I didn't want to show so much interest that the store owner would think I want to buy it :/
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Saki
Member Avatar
Surprisingly not dead
Thats pretty possible. I know Menaglio tends to pop up in music stores from time to time.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
cuallito
Beginner
Well, they're a business, they stock cheap ocarinas because that's all people will buy, most likely.

Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
kissing
Member Avatar
tyrannical dictator

cuallito
25 Apr 2017, 03:55 PM
Well, they're a business, they stock cheap ocarinas because that's all people will buy, most likely.



There are plenty of cheap ocarinas that are actually good quality.

The problem is with lack of awareness in the general community about ocarinas.
Most music store owners don't know squat about ocarinas and will just stock junk that they know nothing about.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Ocypode
Transverse Ocarinist x 2
Also, that's not terribly reassuring about the quality of their other products.

On-line stores often have wider choices, better prices, and are only a click away

So I think that store owner should really be careful about what they do, if they don't want to be completely out-competed.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Harp Player
Member Avatar
Triple Ocarinist
Most music local music stores are either gone, or hanging on by a thread. Just like the neighborhood bookstores are now gone.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
CFWhitman
Initiate
Ocypode
25 Apr 2017, 08:27 PM
Also, that's not terribly reassuring about the quality of their other products.

On-line stores often have wider choices, better prices, and are only a click away

So I think that store owner should really be careful about what they do, if they don't want to be completely out-competed.
Yes, exactly. What advantage is there to going to a brick and mortar music store if the proprietor isn't taking care to know enough to stock the best available instruments for the price? What are his customers paying him a little extra over online prices for if not for his knowledge of the instruments he is selling?

A brick and mortar store can be a tremendous advantage for beginners, especially for instruments which benefit from fine adjustments, like for example guitars and ukuleles. If you don't get those advantages, there's no reason to go to one.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Lizpen
Beginner
I've been talking to my local Christian School who is looking into musical instruments for their music class. My son's therapist recommended he get into music to help him and my go-to was the ocarina because he likes listening to me practice mine so much. He got the pokeball one, of course, but he's five and he absolutely loves it, and I mentioned to the teacher that he's been playing with the fingering and learning to blow it to make whistle sounds and she was really interested in it. So maybe that's an angle you could approach with the store owner? Another instrument option besides the recorder that would be good for kids to learn music with?
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Kitten Forest
Member Avatar
Double Ocarinist
Ocarinas seem like they would be great for kids as they are fairly simple to play, don't squeak like other wind instruments, and whenever I play and kids are around, they seem to calm down and like it. I've heard of schools in countries outside of North America using ocarina as a school instrument, but as it hasn't come over to most of the world, I don't know how it would take. I'd say convince a school first then people would at least see the instrument and it has a purpose for more than just video game fans.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
1 user reading this topic (1 Guest and 0 Anonymous)
ZetaBoards - Free Forum Hosting
Free Forums with no limits on posts or members.
« Previous Topic · General Ocarina Discussion · Next Topic »
Add Reply



Find us on Twitter Facebook | Read the FAQ